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Sightings - Sunday 17th June 2018

Dorset Bird Club - Sun, 06/17/2018 - 22:41
Whooper Swan - 1 still at Abbotsbury Swannery
Spoonbill - 1 Arne RSPB
Little Ringed Plover - 1 Holton Lee pools
Ringed Plover - 10 Lytchett Fields RSPB
Green Sandpiper - 2 Abbotsbury Swannery

Kestrel - Hengistbury Head © Clinton Whale
Skylark - Hengistbury Head © Clinton Whaleu
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Rough Clover

Nature of Dorset Reference Database - Sun, 06/17/2018 - 21:26

 

A seaside specialist where it thrives in short turf in grassy places

 

Photograph by: Retweet The records for this species have been organised into reports, charts, maps and photos. Click a pic below to see the detail: Sites List Distribution Map Distribution Map Some Charts Some Photographs Original Tweets Relatives Guidance Notes
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Shore Wainscot

Nature of Dorset Reference Database - Sun, 06/17/2018 - 21:23

 

Associated with marram grass and so this is a very localised coastal species

 

Photograph by: Mark Andrews The records for this species have been organised into reports, charts, maps and photos. Click a pic below to see the detail: Sites List Distribution Map Distribution Map Some Charts Some Photographs Original Tweets Relatives Guidance Notes
Categories: Timeline, Twitter

Shears Moth

Nature of Dorset Reference Database - Sun, 06/17/2018 - 21:19

A fairly common species as the larvae have no specific food plants

 

Photograph by: Phyl England The records for this species have been organised into reports, charts, maps and photos. Click a pic below to see the detail: Sites List Distribution Map Distribution Map Some Charts Some Photographs Original Tweets Relatives Guidance Notes
Categories: Timeline, Twitter

Grey Arches

Nature of Dorset Reference Database - Sun, 06/17/2018 - 21:17

A woodland species occurring less often in parks and gardens unless there is deciduous woodland nearby

 

Photograph by: Mark Andrews The records for this species have been organised into reports, charts, maps and photos. Click a pic below to see the detail: Sites List Distribution Map Distribution Map Some Charts Some Photographs Original Tweets Relatives Guidance Notes
Categories: Timeline, Twitter

Turnip Moth

Nature of Dorset Reference Database - Sun, 06/17/2018 - 21:14

A fairly common resident species whose numbers can be boosted even further by immigration

 

Photograph by: Mark Andrews The records for this species have been organised into reports, charts, maps and photos. Click a pic below to see the detail: Sites List Distribution Map Distribution Map Some Charts Some Photographs Original Tweets Relatives Guidance Notes
Categories: Timeline, Twitter

9 Apr 18 - Atlantic Odyssey - Day Twelve: Arrival At Gough Island

Birding in Poole Harbour and Beyond - Sun, 06/17/2018 - 18:00
After four days at sea, we awoke knowing we only had the final hundred nautical miles to reach Gough Island: which was going to be another Seabird spectacle. Gough Island is uninhabited with the exception of a handful of staff at the small meteorological base including a small RSPB research team. Ignoring the occasional visits from supply ships, there must be very few other ships that visit Gough Island during the year. It is probably the most isolated island we visited. There will certainly be a lot more visitors to the Falklands & South Georgia than Gough Island ever gets. The island is around 8 miles long by 4 miles wide with a total size of 35 square miles.
The small meteorological base was on the far side of Gough Island: (10 Apr 18)
Looks like one of the meteorological team or RSPB researchers is photographing us: (10 Apr 18)
There was definitely an air of excitement on the ship today as Gough Island is home to several million pairs of breeding Seabirds & that was clearly evident as we got closer to the island. By mid afternoon, everywhere we looked we could see Seabirds.
Yellow-nosed Albatross: Atlantic Yellow-nosed Albatross breed on Gough & the Tristan da Cunha Islands
Yellow-nosed Albatross: Atlantic Yellow-nosed Albatross. The other subspecies using Clements taxonomy is Indian Yellow-nosed Albatross which breeds on various Subantarctic Islands in the Indian OceanSooty Albatross: Adult
Tristan Wandering Albatross: Adult male. Clements regards this as a subspecies of Wandering Albatross. The plumage phases overlap with those of Snowy Albatross, albeit they tend to breed when they have less extensive white on the wings. This is a typical adult male
Tristan Wandering Albatross: Adult Female. Despite looking quick scruffy, this is typical for breeding age females
Tristan Wandering Albatross: Subadult. Given the overlap in plumages, the best way to separate Tristan Wandering Albatross from other subspecies is by location, so this is clearly a Tristan Wandering Albatross
Tristan Wandering Albatross: Subadult. Another view of the same individual
Tristan Wandering Albatross: Presumed subadult of another final individual. I'm guess this is a subadult, however, some adult females can show a smudgy breast & I've not got upperwing shots of this individual. Ageing is tricky on Wandering Albatrosses, but Flood & Fisher's North Atlantic Seabirds: Albatrosses & Fulmarine Petrels is the best I've seen on this subject of Tristan Wandering AlbatrossesSoft-plumaged Petrel: Part of the daily Pterodroma fixSoft-plumaged PetrelSoft-plumaged Petrel Atlantic Petrel: The other daily Pterodroma in this part of the cruiseBroad-billed Prion: This individual is quite easy to identify with a bill this broadBroad-billed Prion: Close crop to show the bill shapeBroad-billed Prion: Another photo of the same individual
Broad-billed Pion: Another individual
Broad-billed Prion: Another individual
Broad-billed Prion: Underwing of another individual
Broad-billed Prion: A final individual. I can't find any photos of any of the Prions photographed today that look to be MacGillvray's Prions
Broad-billed Prion: Another view of the final individualGreat Shearwater'White-bellied' Black-bellied Storm-petrel: I will come back to the identification of 'White bellied' Black-bellied Storm-petrel from White-bellied Storm-petrel in a future Post
'White-bellied' Black-bellied Storm-petrel: Another photo of the same individual
Brown Skua: Tristan Brown Skua.Clements regards Tristan Brown Skuas as a distinctive subspecies of Brown Skua. They are noticeably different in appearance from the dark Falklands Brown Skua subspecies
Brown Skua: Tristan Brown Skua. They only breed on Gough & the Tristan da Cunha Islands
Brown Skua: Tristan Brown SkuaBy late afternoon, we were making our final approach to Gough Island & over the next hour the island got steadily larger. Not that it was easy to watch it getting larger as there were so many Prions around the Plancius, with a smaller number of other species. It was impossible to figure out overall numbers, but Prion numbers alone must have run into 6 figures. It's certainly the most impressive day I've every seen for numbers of Seabirds. The following morning most of the Prions had dispersed back out to sea: so presumably most left in the dark.Seabirds of Gough Island: There is a Tristan Wandering Albatross, 7 Great Shearwaters, 2 Soft-plumaged Petrels & 4 Prions sp. in this photo: feeding & waiting for the relative safety of dusk to return to their burrowsSeabirds off Gough Island: There is an Atlantic Petrel, 2 Soft-plumaged Petrel & 38 Prion sp. in this photo
Seabirds of Gough Island: There is an Atlantic Petrel & 49 Prion sp. in this photoFirst impressions of Gough Island: There were strong winds blowing around the island, similar to some of the strong katabatic winds that we experienced around South GeorgiaGough Island: It was been a mixture of sunny & overcast during the day, but the light had been reasonable. However, we were now surrounded by low, menacing clouds which added to the atmospheric conditionsGough Island: A panoramic view of the island showing how localised the cloud wasGough Island: An impressive sea stackGough IslandGough Island sea stackGiven we were going to spend the night off Gough Island, then the plan was for a slow cruise around part of the island to allow us to enjoy the Seabirds & views. Gough Island: Close up of the right hand end of our view of the islandGough Island: With all this weather, it's perhaps not surprising there was also a rainbowA close up of the right hand corner of the islandThe strength of the wind coming over the island is evident from the flag: The flag is starting to get tatty after all the weather it has experienced
Gough Island: What was clear was the there was a strong swell & the wind was whipping up the seaGough Island: It wasn't looking promising that we would be able to get a zodiac cruise in the morningGathering in the observation lounge for the Wildwings log in the evening: It was going to be a long log trying to figure out the numbers of Seabirds seen
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17 Jun 18

Martin Adlam - Sun, 06/17/2018 - 17:19
Pennsylvania Castle Wood, St Andrews Church and Rufus Castle

The reverse walk of yesterdays. Still very windy and today it was wall to wall cloud and the occasional spot of drizzle. Not ideal for bug hunting, but I did find a few.

Heading down through Penn's wood I came across 4 juvenile Chaffinches and 2 juvenile Wrens. Though I wouldn't be surprised if there were many more juveniles Wrens lurking in the bushes and undergrowth. They are very adept at losing themselves when they want to.

Also here a few Swollen-thighed Beetles and what I believe is a Hoverfly, Syrphus vitripennis as opposed to Syrphus ribesii. The difference being A. vitripennis has a black femur (top segment of leg), which the photo below just shows. In the case of S. ribesii it is all yellow.

In the grounds of St Andrews Church I was amazed to discover that all the Mullein caterpillars had disappeared. I searched all the neighbouring plants, but they had definitely gone. Were they really ready to pupate or did someone help themselves!

On the steps halfway between Rufus Castle and Church Ope Cove I came across a really bizarre looking spider with warts. well that's what they look like. One to ID

On my shortcut through to Wakeham, I came across several Common Carder Bees and what I believe is a Bombus hortorum (Three-banded White-tailed Bumblebee). However bees as you've probably seen already are not my best forte.

Also along here I came across the nymph of a Speckled Bush Cricket, another Marmalade Hoverfly and one of my favourite flies the Semaphore Fly, Poecilobothrus nobilitatus

Images as seen en-route.

One of the 4 juvenile Chaffinches sat in a Horse Chestnut Tree.
A short video of one of the juvenile Chaffinches.
A Swollen-thighed Beetle on a Dog Rose.
A different flower head and what I'm pretty sure is a Syrphus vitripennis hoverfly.
The distinguishing feature apparently is that S. ribesii has all yellow legs whereas here S. vitripennis has black on the top section of the leg.

Yesterday afternoon this plant was full of Mullein caterpillars. Today they have all disappeared! I looked around at neighbouring plants, but they have vanished. I can't believe they have all decided to pupate and I do feel that human intervention has played a part in their disappearance.

Now there are spiders and there are spiders. However this one looks like its mimicking a Toad with all those warts on its abdomen. What species is it, I have absolutely no idea and I can't find a match anywhere.

A Marmalade Hoverfly, Episyrphus balteatus
I'm not brilliant at identifying bees, but I'll have a go with Bombus hortorum. Please feel free to correct me!

A Speckled Bush Cricket nymph, Leptophyes punctatissima
One of my favourite flies, the Semaphore Fly, Poecilobothrus nobilitatus 
And another Marmalade Hoverfly.
Categories: Blogs, Timeline, Twitter

The nature of Dorset in tweets, charts, photos and maps ... 16-06-18

Nature of Dorset Records Timeline - Sun, 06/17/2018 - 08:36
Click/tap the logo to proceed to the page.

The nature of Dorset yesterday in tweets, charts, photographs and maps along with other sources of news of nature conservation and general wildlife interest:

  • Yesterday.s recorded sightings of mammals, birds, insects, plants and more
  • The current recording "hot-list" - the best recorded 30 species in the last 30 days
  • A map of sites where yesterdays records came from - what was seen near you?
  • Yesterday's records in graphical form to show the highlights
  • The pick of the photographs that came with the tweets
  • Interesting news items, notices of events and links to blogs
  • Links to the Nature of Dorset Daily newspaper and to various other blogs from Dorset conservation organisations

Everything you wanted to know and more ... and it's free of charge and free of adverts!

 

Published Date: Monday, 25 December, 2017 - 09:30 newsdesk logo.jpg
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16th June

Portland Bird Observatory - Sat, 06/16/2018 - 23:58
Very little to report that would be of even the slightest interest to anyone from off-island: 44 Common Scoter passed through off the Bill, a Turnstone was new on the land there and 2 Dunlin, a Black-headed Gull and a Mediterranean Gull were at Ferrybridge.

Since it's looking like the spring passage of all but the tardiest individual common migrants has fizzled out we thought it'd be timely to have a quick review of how the season's panned out for some of our most numerous migrants; as before, this is perhaps easiest to gauge by having a peek at the Obs ringing totals. From what we've heard from elsewhere we get the impression that the numbers of both migrants on the coast and breeders inland are considered to be well down this year, but this wasn't entirely reflected at Portland. Willow Warbler and Whitethroat were perhaps the most conspicuous losers - as much because they're usually so numerous here - but maybe a little more under the radar were the notably poor totals of Sedge Warbler, Reed Warbler and Lesser Whitethroat. Chiffchaff, Redstart and Pied Flycatcher were right on par with recent years, whilst Blackcap has been doing so well lately that the slight drop in their numbers was, arguably, only what might have been expected in an indifferent season. Garden Warbler looks have bounced right back from a series of poor years and Spotted Flycatcher was the biggest winner of all among the long distance migrants, with not far off record numbers ringed this spring. Finally, bearing in mind the severity of the late winter it was a welcome surprise that both 'crests looked to have survived really well.

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Sightings - Saturday 16th June 2018

Dorset Bird Club - Sat, 06/16/2018 - 22:48
Whooper Swan - 1 still Abbotsbury Swannery
Little Ringed Plover - Holton Lee pools
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16 Jun 18

Martin Adlam - Sat, 06/16/2018 - 21:24
Rufus Castle, St Andrews Church and Pennsylvania Castle Wood

I've not done this walk for quite awhile, so despite the windy conditions it was off on my travels to see what was about. There's a short cut I take to the cliff top just pass the old Dolphin Public Castle and I'm glad I opted for this route, as the first beetle I came across was a Spotted Longhorn or Black & Yellow Longhorn as its often called (Rutpela maculata).

A bit further along the track I came across the empty shell casing of a Bloody-nosed Beetle (Timarcha tenebricosa) and was the only specimen of this species, albeit dead, that I found. My last walk here produced quite a few.

On the way down the steps from from Rufus Castle to Church Ope Cove an ichneumon wasp flew past me and into the bushes. I have seen this ichneumon wasp before but it's one that I've still not identified beyond one of the Heteropelma species.

Also here were a family party of Long-tailed Tits, all busy feeding in amongst the Sycamores in the copse half-way down the steps. In total there 7 juveniles and the 2 adult birds.

A slight diversion onto the cliff top overlooking Church Ope Cove and I came across a Mimic Bee Hoverfly (Volucella bombylans). Its funny that I'm finding more V. bombylans than the "white-tailed" V. plumata. A similar thing happens with both Common Drone Flies and Tapered Drone Flies, the latter (Eristalis pertinax) always come out later in the year than (Eristalis tenax).

In the grounds of St Andrew's Church I acme across 2 Six-spot Burnet Moths (Zygaena filipendulae) settled in the grass, whilst on a large leafy plant (well what was left of it I came across a dozen or so caterpillars of this nationally scarce moth The Mullein moth (Cucullia verbasci). More on this moth Here.

Still in the church grounds I came across the aptly named Rose Chafer on the flower of a Dog Rose.

Here are a few images from my walk:

This is a Spotted Longhorn (Rutpela maculata), also know as the Black and Yellow Longhorn. This species can often be seen feeding on nectar on the flower heads such as hogweed or cow parsley. The larvae feed on rotting tree stumps, especially birch and pine.
An ichneumon wasp I have come across before, but not beyond one of the Heteropelma species.
One of the 7 juvenile Long-tailed Tits in the copse half-way down the steps to Church Ope Cove from Rufus Castle.

Lovely to see a family party of 7 juvenile Long-tailed Tits and the adults in the copse, half-way the steps from Rufus Castle to Church Ope Cove.

This is Rock Stonecrop (Sedum forsterianum), with Pennsylvania Castle in the background. This flower is yet to open, so I will be back when it does. More on this flower Here
Having seen quite a few Mimic Bee Hoverflies (Volucella plumata) it is now seems to be the turn of Volucella bombylans to put in an appearance. This one was above the north cliff of Church Ope Cove.
The very lush green grounds of St Andrew's Church
In the church grounds I came across 2 Six-spot Burnet Moths...........
.........and these very colourful caterpillars.......
........and they belong to........
......The Mullein Moth (Shargacucullia verbasci). These are in their final stages of development as caterpillars and will be pupating soon.
Appropriately named this Rose Chafer (Cetonia auata) is on the flower of a Dog Rose, in the grounds of St Andrew's Church
A White-lipped Banded Snail (Cepaea hortensis) the nettles in Penn's wood
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Bulrush Wainscot

Nature of Dorset Reference Database - Sat, 06/16/2018 - 18:26

Found around wetland habitats where bulrush and lesser bulrush occur

 

Photograph by: Peter Orchard The records for this species have been organised into reports, charts, maps and photos. Click a pic below to see the detail: Sites List Distribution Map Distribution Map Some Charts Some Photographs Original Tweets Relatives Guidance Notes
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Gem Moth

Nature of Dorset Reference Database - Sat, 06/16/2018 - 18:21

 

An immigrant species from southern Europe occuring in large numbers in some years

 

Photograph by: Peter Orchard The records for this species have been organised into reports, charts, maps and photos. Click a pic below to see the detail: Sites List Distribution Map Distribution Map Some Charts Some Photographs Original Tweets Relatives Guidance Notes
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Red Chestnut Moth

Nature of Dorset Reference Database - Sat, 06/16/2018 - 18:17

 

A common very early species found in many habitats

 

Photograph by: Peter Orchard The records for this species have been organised into reports, charts, maps and photos. Click a pic below to see the detail: Sites List Distribution Map Distribution Map Some Charts Some Photographs Original Tweets Relatives Guidance Notes
Categories: Timeline, Twitter

Small Phoenix

Nature of Dorset Reference Database - Sat, 06/16/2018 - 18:12

 

A widespread species found in, or near, open woodland

 

Photograph by: Peter Orchard The records for this species have been organised into reports, charts, maps and photos. Click a pic below to see the detail: Sites List Distribution Map Distribution Map Some Charts Some Photographs Original Tweets Relatives Guidance Notes
Categories: Timeline, Twitter

8 Apr 18 - Atlantic Odyssey - Day Eleven: At Sea From South Georgia To Gough Island - Strap-toothed Beaked Whale

Birding in Poole Harbour and Beyond - Sat, 06/16/2018 - 18:00
We saw a good selection of Seabirds species on the penultimate day at sea on the crossing from South Georgia to Gough Island (as detailed in the previous Post). However, the Seabirds are not the main reason why I will remember the day. The main reason is I saw my first Strap-toothed Beaked Whales which helped to start getting me more hooked on Cetaceans. I've had a lot of enthusiasm to see Cetaceans for over 20 years since the annual trips I was going on in the late 90s to the Spanish port of Biscay from Portsmouth. However, by the time I left the Plancius I was really hooked on Cetacean watching from boats. This is going to be an expensive new passion.
Strap-toothed Beaked Whale: The initial view on the surface before it quickly disappeared
Strap-toothed Beaked Whale: Fortunately, it came up again fairly close to the ship. Another typical Beaked Whale view, which gives a rough idea of the size, shape & that it is a Beaked Whale. But not enough to identify it on these viewsFew things got me more excited when I was on deck than a shout for a Beaked Whale. I tried to get onto the Beaked Whale quickly, as generally you don't get long views & then to grab as many photos as possible to assist with the subsequent identification. There are 22 species of Beaked Whales & the group includes many of the least known Cetaceans. Beaked Whales tend to live in deep water, are generally unobtrusive as despite being a medium-sized Cetacean (between 4-13 metres in length), they don't seem to have strong blows like the big Whales, generally don't jump out of the water like Dolphins, generally don't seem to associate with boats like Dolphins or hang around on the surface like some of Blackfish group of Cetaceans. What they are good at is generally not spending a lot of time on the surface, quietly & quickly disappearing back under the water, occur on their own or in small groups & are generally tricky to identify. Given how tricky they can be to identify & the brevity of views, then getting good photos is crucial. It will also be very useful in then allowing the records to be documented & submitted (Marijke & Hans from the Expedition staff were diligently recording lat/long positions of the Cetaceans, Turtles & good Seabirds, Sharks etc on the Odyssey). In some cases, Marijke said she would have to forward the photos of some of our Beaked Whale sightings to Beaked Whale experts to hope they would be able to identify then.
Strap-toothed Beaked Whale: One of the most important parts to photograph on a Beaked Whale is the beak. However, this involves knowing when & where it will surface, so that you can be photographing the beak as it breaks the surface. This is very hard to get right. Most people's photos of Beaked Whales will start with the back & fin, as by the time you see it appear & react the beak has already disappeared back below the surface
Strap-toothed Beaked Whale: I seem to remember Hans dashing into the bridge & asking them to stop the Plancius as the Beaked Whales were close to the ship. Fortunately, they did & we had an incredible performance
Strap-toothed Beaked Whale: Very quickly this individual just quietly slipped below the water again
Having just started watching from the bridge wings, I found out the good way what a great viewpoint this was for seeing Cetaceans. It was a good high viewpoint & overall it allowed much better views of Cetaceans. Often they would be lost in the waves from the lower decks. Plus either Marijke or Hans, both excellent experienced Cetacean watchers, were almost always on the bridge wings when we were at sea. Having worked out it was the best viewpoint on the ship for me, I rarely spent time elsewhere on the other decks for the rest of the trip. The other bonuses of the bridge wings for me were Marijke & Hans were spending more of their time looking for Cetaceans. As the trip progressed, I was also focusing more on Cetaceans, once any potential new Birds had been seen. Finally, both Marijke & Hans were very keen to share their extensive knowledge on identification & behaviour of the Cetaceans we were seeing. My Cetacean knowledge grew significantly during the Odyssey & subsequent West African Pelagic.Strap-toothed Beaked Whale: This individual popped up unexpectedly close to the Plancius & I didn't manage to get it all in. It is just possible to see some pale colouration on the rear of the fin
Strap-toothed Beaked Whale: This pale colouration on the rear of the fin is one of the features of Strap-toothed Beaked Whale
The next photos are of a second individual: there is a lot of pale colouration on the body in front of the fin & the fin has a different shape.
Strap-toothed Beaked Whale: Note the paleness on the sides of the body in front of the fin. This is another feature of Strap-toothed Beaked Whale
Strap-toothed Beaked Whale: Another photo of the sides of the body
Strap-toothed Beaked Whale: A close up of the fin of the second individual showing the distinctive kink in the back of the fin. Note, the paleness on the body doesn't continue behind the fin & the fin is dark
This individual appeared at right angles to the Plancius.
Strap-toothed Beaked Whale: The blow hole is just visible
Strap-toothed Beaked Whale: Finally the fin appears
Strap-toothed Beaked Whale
Strap-toothed Beaked Whale: Another surfacing individual
Strap-toothed Beaked Whale: The fin breaks free of the water & looks like this is the individual with the pale rear fin
Finally, this individual surfaced & allowed another important id feature to be photographed.
Strap-toothed Beaked Whale: Another feature of Strap-toothed Beaked Whale are the diastoms on the body
Strap-toothed Beaked Whale: A close up of the diatoms
Strap-toothed Beaked Whale: Another photo of the diatoms. These diatoms are caused by patches of microscopic algaeIt was great to see a new Beaked Whale & to get these great prolonged views. It is believed that Strap-toothed Beaked Whales have a continuous distribution in the Southern Oceans from 35 to 60 degrees South. They largely eat squid, but are thought to also eat fish & crustaceans.

The day after I drafted this Post, I had an email from Marijke who had followed on these Strap-toothed Beaked Whales by sending photos of them, including some of my photos, to a couple of Beaked Whale experts. Here was the response:-
Many thanks for your contribution of photographs regarding our beautiful Beaked Whale encounter on 8 April 2018 when we were in transit to Gough Island. Their identification has been confirmed. They are Strap-toothed beaked whale (Mesoplodon layardii). It was a group of sub-adults/females. Based on an encounter earlier this year, Beaked Whale expert Robert Pitman learnt more about the colour development of these Whales off Australia and now our encounter has taught him even more. I also have discussed this encounter with Todd Pusser - who has studied stranded Beaked Whales. They both are now quite convinced they were Strap-toothed Beaked Whale. The white of the beak, the white-tipped dorsal and the strong black-and-white patterns develops with age. This explains why some Whales did not have a white tipped dorsal yet and why it was visible on only one Whale although only faint. Marijke
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Early Tooth-Striped

Nature of Dorset Reference Database - Sat, 06/16/2018 - 16:05

 

A common early species associated with birch and willow

 

Photograph by: Peter Orchard The records for this species have been organised into reports, charts, maps and photos. Click a pic below to see the detail: Sites List Distribution Map Distribution Map Some Charts Some Photographs Original Tweets Relatives Guidance Notes
Categories: Timeline, Twitter

Square-spot Rustic

Nature of Dorset Reference Database - Sat, 06/16/2018 - 15:59

 

As a species that occurs in grassland habitat it is common almost everywhere

 

Photograph by: Peter Orchard The records for this species have been organised into reports, charts, maps and photos. Click a pic below to see the detail: Sites List Distribution Map Distribution Map Some Charts Some Photographs Original Tweets Relatives Guidance Notes
Categories: Timeline, Twitter

Small Grass Emerald

Nature of Dorset Reference Database - Sat, 06/16/2018 - 15:55

 

A local species found occasionally in heathland habitat

 

Photograph by: Peter Orchard The records for this species have been organised into reports, charts, maps and photos. Click a pic below to see the detail: Sites List Distribution Map Distribution Map Some Charts Some Photographs Original Tweets Relatives Guidance Notes
Categories: Timeline, Twitter

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