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12 Apr 18

Martin Adlam - Thu, 04/12/2018 - 12:22
Crown Estate Fields, Culverwell, Hut Fields and Obs Quarry.

Another beautiful start to the day and it was up early (well early for me) and it was down to the Portland Bird Observatory for 8:10am. As I walked around to the patio area I spotted to flocks of Common Scoter heading north over the sea, there were two parties of 9 and 5. A good start.

My first stop on my walk was the horse field here, where there was a splendid looking male Ring Ouzel. A bird flew past it as I was watching it and my first thought was that it was hen Pheasant because of the colouration. And then I thought hang on its way to small, a quick adjustment with the binoculars and I was looking at my first Mistle Thrush on the island since moving down here at the end of May last year. By all accounts Mistle Thrush are quite scarce on the island so well chuffed I've finally bagged one.

Also in the brambles here were 1 male and 2 female Stonechats, whilst flying through were Skylarks and Meadow Pipits.

I made my way up the track and alongside Helen's Field, before heading south towards Culverwell. Just about here were a dozen or so Fieldfare, Redwing and Blackbirds feeding in the field. In the bushes I also managed my first Willow Warbler of the year. In Culverwell there were several Chiffchaffs flitting about and 3 Greenfinches.

From here I headed off to the Obs quarry, where there were at least 5 Chiffchaff. From here I then took a walk through the hut fields before heading back to the Obs. Still more Chiffchaffs about and also a pair of Black Redstarts. There was one possible 2 Bullfinches in the Blackthorn bushes and I managed some good views of 2 more Willow Warblers, one of which was really yellow. Sadly not a Wood Warbler, though one was seen a few days ago at Lodmoor wood.

Back at the Obs and a few small parties of hirundine passed over with several Swallows and 2 House Martins. Here there was a Willow Warbler singing in the garden and also another Greenfinch.

Here are few images from today including record shots of the Ring Ouzel and Mistle Thrush.

A record shot of the male Ring Ouzel in the horse field just west of the Crown Estate Fields.
Also my first Mistle Thrush here as well. A scarce visitor to the island.
Still a few Fieldfare about.
Another.
A pair maybe. Certainly a difference in colouration
And tagging along with the Fieldfare a few Redwings. This one perched in Culverwell.
A Chiffchaff
And a rear view of a Willow Warbler.
There were a pair of Black Redstarts in the Hut Fields. This is the female.
And here is a female Bullfinch tucking into a few buds.
A Goldfinch in the Obs garden with some nesting material.
And finally a Peacock butterfly with bee sp. behind.
Birds Recorded: 1 Gannet, 14 Common Scoter, 1 Sparrowhawk, Buzzard, Kestrel, Pheasant, Oystercatcher, Herring Gull, Great Black-backed Gull, Stock Dove, Wood Pigeon, Skylark, 2 House Martin, 7 Swallow, Meadow Pipit, Dunnock, Robin, 3 Stonechat, 2 Black Redstart, Blackbird, 1 Ring Ouzel, 5 Fieldfare, 7 Redwing, 1 Song Thrush, 1 Mistle Thrush, 15+ Chiffchaff, 3 Willow Warbler, Great Tit, Blue Tit, Wren, Magpie, Rook, Carrion Crow, Jackdaw, 1 Raven, Starling, House Sparrow, Chaffinch, Linnet, Goldfinch, 4 Greenfinch and 2 Bullfinch.

Also 1 Peacock Butterfly
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The nature of Dorset in tweets, charts, photos and maps ... 11-04-18

Nature of Dorset Records Timeline - Thu, 04/12/2018 - 08:23
Click/tap the logo to proceed to the page.

The nature of Dorset yesterday in tweets, charts, photographs and maps along with other sources of news of nature conservation and general wildlife interest:

  • Yesterday.s recorded sightings of mammals, birds, insects, plants and more
  • The current recording "hot-list" - the best recorded 30 species in the last 30 days
  • A map of sites where yesterdays records came from - what was seen near you?
  • Yesterday's records in graphical form to show the highlights
  • The pick of the photographs that came with the tweets
  • Interesting news items, notices of events and links to blogs
  • Links to the Nature of Dorset Daily newspaper and to various other blogs from Dorset conservation organisations

Everything you wanted to know and more ... and it's free of charge and free of adverts!

 

Published Date: Sunday, 18 March, 2018 - 09:30 newsdesk logo.jpg
Categories: Timeline, Twitter

11th April

Portland Bird Observatory - Wed, 04/11/2018 - 21:59
After the gloom - literal and metaphorical - of the last few days today was a revelation of sunshine, warmth and migrants. The clearance overhead saw plenty of birds get moving, with grounded totals at the Bill of 150 Chiffchaffs, 100 Blackcaps, 75 each of Wheatear and Willow Warbler, 50 Fieldfares, 30 Redwings, 10 Redstarts, 4 Black Redstarts, 2 each of White Wagtail, Grasshopper Warbler, Whitethroat, Brambling and Redpoll and singles of Ring Ouzel, Mistle Thrush and Firecrest, whilst visible passage included 6 Yellow Wagtails amongst the lightish movement of Meadow Pipits, hirundines and finches; reports from elsewhere included the 'Eastern' Lesser Whitethroat still at Southwell, a Pied Flycatcher at Weston and the Green Woodpecker at Portland Port. On an otherwise good day the sea was the poor relation, with 45 Manx Shearwaters, 41 Common Scoter and a Little Egret through off the Bill and 3 Curlews and singles of Whimbrel, Bar-tailed Godwit and Arctic Tern the best of equally poor numbers off Chesil.

Having handled and seen any number of perplexing 'Heinz 57' redpolls over the years we've always been sceptical of the merit of splitting them into a variety of species/forms. Yesterday's bird turned up in a net today permitting a closer look at it: plumage-wise, there wasn't really much to add to what had been visible in the field...


...and on the face of it you wouldn't have thought it could have been anything other than what would conventionally be called a Lesser; however, it had looked to be noticeably long-winged in the field and, sure enough, the primary projection measured up to be outside the published range for Lesser © Martin Cade
Categories: Timeline, Twitter

Reports of interest, Wednesday 11th April 2018.

Dorset Bird Club - Wed, 04/11/2018 - 21:50
Garganey - 4 Holes Bay (Upton Country Park).
Great Northern Diver - 1 off Bowleaze.
Marsh Harrier - 1+ through Christchurch Harbour.
Red Kite - 1 W over Christchurch Harbour.
Grey Plover - 2 Stanpit.
Bonaparte's Gull - 1 still at Longham Lakes now putting on summer plumage.
Short-Eared Owl - 1 Jordan Hill (Preston).
Redstart - 3 Hengistbury Head.
Whitethroat - 1+ Portland.
Lesser Whitethroat - 1 presumed blythi still at Reap Lane (Portland).
Firecrest - 1 Hengistbury Head, 1 Suckthumb Quarry (Portland).
Hawfinch - 12 Lower Bryanston.

Bonaparte's Gull at Longham Lakes © Nick Hull
Bonaparte's Gull at Longham Lakes © Nick Hull
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Devils coach-horse

Nature of Dorset Reference Database - Wed, 04/11/2018 - 18:48

 

 

Best known of the rove beetles, faitly common in gardens and around outbuildings

 

Photograph by: James Gale The records for this species have been organised into reports, charts, maps and photos. Click a pic below to see the detail: Sites List Distribution Map Some Charts Some Photographs Original Tweets Relatives Guidance Notes
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Tawny Pinion

Nature of Dorset Reference Database - Wed, 04/11/2018 - 18:42

Associated with ash trees and found across much of southern England

 

 

Photograph by: Mark Andrews The records for this species have been organised into reports, charts, maps and photos. Click a pic below to see the detail: Sites List Distribution Map Some Charts Some Photographs Original Tweets Relatives Guidance Notes
Categories: Timeline, Twitter

11 Apr 18

Martin Adlam - Wed, 04/11/2018 - 17:08
Pennsylvania Castle Wood, Church Ope Cove, Penn's Weare and Rufus Castle

Certainly the warmest day this Spring and T-shirt weather. Its been a long time coming.

In Pennsylvania Castle Wood my first 10-spot Ladybird (Adalia decempunctata). A very small ladybird approximately 4mm in length.

Main highlights though were several Chiffchaffs at St Andrew's Church, Church Ope Cove, Penn's Weare and my first one singing by Portland Museum. Also a Blackcap with a sub-song in the grounds of St Andrews Church where there were 3 Wall Lizards, Peacock and Comma butterflies.

A lot of holidaymakers on the beach at Church Ope Cove, but on the south facing bank more Chiffchaffs and Peacock butterflies.

Along Penn's Weare both Blackbird and Robin singing. Also here more Peacock butterflies with several males trying to woo females in at least 3 groups. Also here a Dark-edged Bee-fly, Bombylius major, my first on the island, Marmalade Hoverfly and the hoverfly Syrphus torvus. Along the cliff face a pair of Swallows were making their way north. Also here several Fulmars.

A few images from this afternoon:

One of the few Chiffchaffs in the grounds of St Andrew's Church
In flight, shame about the twig across its eye.
and another flight shot.
Settled.
A Peregrine overhead.
One of the 3 Wall Lizards in the grounds of St Andrew's Church.
I must have seen over 15 Peacock butterflies. This was the only one to land for a photo.
In Pennsylvania Castle Wood I found this 10-spot Ladybird (Adalia decempunctata)........
.........a really small ladybird........
..........approximately 4mm in length. 
 Dark-edged Bee-fly, Bombylius major found along Penn's Weare. More on bee-flies Here.
If I've got this right this is an Ivy-leaved Toadflax (Cymbalaria muralis)
Birds Recorded: Fulmar, 1 Gannet, Sparrowhawk, 1 Peregrine Falcon, Herring Gull, Great Black-backed Gull, Wood Pigeon, 2 Swallows, Meadow Pipit, Dunnock, Robin, Blackbird, 1 Blackcap, 8 Chiffchaff, Long-tailed Tit, Great Tit, Blue Tit, Wren, Magpie, Carrion Crow, Jackdaw, House Sparrow, Chaffinch, Linnet and Goldfinch.

Also seen: 3 Wall Lizards, 15+ Peacock butterflies, 1 Comma, Honey Bees, White-tailed Bumblebees, Red-tailed Cuckoo-bee, Common Drone FlyMarmalade Hoverfly, hoverfly Syrphus torvus, 10-spot Ladybird (Adalia decempunctata) and a Dark-edged Bee-fly (Bombylius major). The latter two being firsts for me on the island.
Categories: Blogs, Timeline, Twitter

The nature of Dorset in tweets, charts, photos and maps ... 10-04-18

Nature of Dorset Records Timeline - Wed, 04/11/2018 - 07:50
Click/tap the logo to proceed to the page.

The nature of Dorset yesterday in tweets, charts, photographs and maps along with other sources of news of nature conservation and general wildlife interest:

  • Yesterday.s recorded sightings of mammals, birds, insects, plants and more
  • The current recording "hot-list" - the best recorded 30 species in the last 30 days
  • A map of sites where yesterdays records came from - what was seen near you?
  • Yesterday's records in graphical form to show the highlights
  • The pick of the photographs that came with the tweets
  • Interesting news items, notices of events and links to blogs
  • Links to the Nature of Dorset Daily newspaper and to various other blogs from Dorset conservation organisations

Everything you wanted to know and more ... and it's free of charge and free of adverts!

 

Published Date: Sunday, 18 March, 2018 - 09:30 newsdesk logo.jpg
Categories: Timeline, Twitter

10th April

Portland Bird Observatory - Tue, 04/10/2018 - 22:16
A very gradual improvement in the weather didn't come nearly soon enough to perk up passage on land or sea today and, with the exception of a peculiar although not entirely unprecedented arrival of winter thrushes, it remained pretty quiet for mid-April. The thrushes included 57 Fieldfares and 50 Redwings at the Bill and 11 Fieldfares at Reap Lane, whilst other migrant totals at the Bill included 25 Blackcaps, 20 each of Wheatear and Chiffchaff, 10 Willow Warblers, 2 Short-eared Owls and singles of Black Redstart, Ring Ouzel, Firecrest and Redpoll; visible passage there was never heavy but included a trickle of hirundines, Meadow Pipits and Linnets. Elsewhere, the 'Eastern' Lesser Whitethroat lingered on at Southwell. Reduced visibility curtailed seawatching through the morning and the only worthwhile report from the afternoon was of 3 Red-throated Divers through off the Bill.

This quite colourful Redpoll was a rather unusual visitor to the Obs garden feeders around which it lingered for the best part of the day © Martin Cade: 
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Reports of interest, Tuesday 10th April 2018.

Dorset Bird Club - Tue, 04/10/2018 - 20:58
Goosander - 1 Christchurch Harbour.
CRANE - 1 over Upton Heath area.
Spoonbill - 1 Christchurch Harbour.
Red Kite - 1 N over Christchurch Harbour.
Bonaparte's Gull - 1 still at Longham Lakes.
Redstart - 1 Hengistbury Head.
Lesser Whitethroat - 1 presumed blythi still at Reap Lane (Portland).
Wood Warbler - 1 Lodmoor.
Hawfinch - 70 Lower Bryanston.

Wood Warbler at Lodmoor © Daragh Croxson 
Categories: Timeline, Twitter

10 Apr 18

Martin Adlam - Tue, 04/10/2018 - 17:09
Wakeham

Work has started on the new housing estate behind the cottage, well actually it started yesterday, not that you could see anything in the dense fog. Yesterday Bumpers Lane was closed off to the Portland Stone lorries and despite a few lorries turning off Wakeham into Bumpers, all the drivers got the "message" that access is only possible via The Grove. That's going to go down well with the residence in Easton.

Back to today and the fog lingered for most of the morning, and apart from a brief sunny interlude it was back to grey skies late afternoon. On the feeders were 3 Goldfinches, 2 Great Tits, a Chaffinch and a Blue Tit sporting a metal ring on its leg.

Overhead the gulls were noisy at times during the day, but despite sticking my head out in the hope of seeing a "Osprey" or any raptor, there didn't appear to be anything about. Just Herring Gulls being Herring Gulls!!

Only real highlight today was a Lesser Redpoll passing overhead, my first for the year.

Two Goldfinches on the feeders..........
.........a third on another........
.......and a Blue Tit sporting a ring on its leg.
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A visit to Dorchester: a museum and an important ceremony – 5th April 2018

Gryllos Blog - Tue, 04/10/2018 - 08:43

This post covers our brief visit to Dorchester for an important ceremony. Whilst there we took the opportunity to visit Dorset County Museum.

 

There can be no more spectacular foyer of any building in the world than that of the Natural History Museum in Kensington, London. Apart from the architecture, this enormous space is filled with a cast of a Diplodocus skeleton – or at least it was! The powers that be have decided that after being on show for 102 years this magnificent exhibit has had its day and now it must go. But before it vanishes into packing boxes in the museum’s vaults it’s going on tour and the first destination is ….

 

…. Dorset County Museum in Dorchester! Of course the dimensions of Dorset County Museum are considerably less than the museum in Kensington and it only just fits.

 

Indeed the relatively tiny skull could only be incorporated by removing part of the balcony and enclosing it in glass (hence the reflections) and the incredibly long tail had to be bent double.

 

And these same reflections prevent you getting a photo of the whole animal, as there is no viewpoint from which you can get a clear shot. This may sound like the rantings of an old bloke but I’m getting increasingly annoyed by the cult of the ‘selfie’. I see nothing wrong with taking a photo of your family and friends or of yourself  (best done against a neutral background) and of course if you go to see an exhibit or a lovely view you want to photograph it but why must you have yourself in every picture. Apart from anything else it stops the rest of us from getting a good view.

 

But what of the dinosaur itself. Of course it’s not the original fossil, that would be far too heavy to be held up by such flimsy support. Diplodocus was first described as a new species of sauropod dinosaur in 1878 by Professor Othniel C Marsh at Yale University. The species lived sometime between 156 and 145 million years ago and belongs to a group called sauropods, meaning ‘lizard feet’. The cast is of a fossilised skeleton found in Wyoming USA in 1898 and exhibited in Scottish-born millionaire businessman Andrew Carnegie heard of the discovery and set out to acquire the bones as a centrepiece for his new museum in Pittsburgh. King Edward VII saw a sketch of the Diplodocus while visiting Carnegie at his Scottish castle and remarked how much he’d like a similar specimen for the animal galleries of the Natural History Museum. Carnegie obliged by commissioning a replica cast of his dinosaur which was exhibited in the museum in 1905. (information taken from the Natural History Museum website)

 

There was a lot more to Dorset County Museum than ‘Dippy’. Dippy was a Jurassic dinosaur from the period (200-145 million years ago) and of course Dorset is the location the famous Jurassic coast. Many other fossils from that period are represented, these dinosaur footprints were unearthed near Swanage.

 

The jaws of a Pliosaur.

 

and a small Ichthyosaur.

 

There were plenty of human artifacts as well. These crude stone tools date from about the Paleolithic period 450,000 years ago, the time our Neanderthal cousins roamed the country.

 

By the time of the Mesolithic period (12,000 to 7,000 years ago in NW Europe but earlier in the Middle East) many fine stone tools were in use, flaked off the flint cores seen on the left. The remains of a mesolithic settlement has been excavated in recent years on Portland.

 

By the Neolithic period Britons were farming, however some hunting must have still occurred as evidenced by this deer antler pick and the skull of an auroch, the enormous wild ancestor of domestic cattle which survived in the wild in Europe until just 400 years ago. although were extinct in Britain by the Bronze Age.

 

Moving onto the Bronze Age, 4500 to 2800 years ago. Dorset had a thriving Bronze Age culture as seen by the many bronze swords and implements found.

 

By the late Bronze Age beautiful gold necklaces or torcs were being worn by the nobility.

 

The Iron Age (2800 years ago until Roman invasion in 43 AD) saw the emergence of tribal groups such as the Durotriges who lived in Dorset and surrounding areas. They were responsible for the many hill forts such as Maiden Castle that dot the landscape even today. These two skeletons were discovered at Maiden Castle …

 

There is no doubt about the cause of death of one of them, a Roman ballista bolt though the spine.

 

Maiden Castle near Dorchester was the largest Iron Age hill fort in Britain and was occupied by the Durotriges up until the Roman invasion. We visited the site with our granddaughter Amber a few years ago.

 

Of course he Romans left plenty of archaeological evidence behind in Dorset such as this mosaic.

 

The County Museum also features a section on famous Dorset writers and poets ….

 

… including this reconstruction of Thomas Hardy’s study.

 

Enjoyable as it was our visit to the museum was just filling in time on the way to the main event of the day. Margaret had an important appointment at Dorset County Council’s chamber ….

 

…. joining ten other applicants for the ceremony that would award her British citizenship.

 

After swearing an oath and singing ‘God Save the Queen’ she was presented with her citizenship certificate by a local dignitary.

 

It has taken quite a while (the main delay was getting the necessary documentation from South Africa) but after nine years of marriage I’m no longer married to a foreigner!

Categories: Blogs, Timeline, Twitter

The nature of Dorset in tweets, charts, photos and maps ... 09-04-18

Nature of Dorset Records Timeline - Tue, 04/10/2018 - 07:44
Click/tap the logo to proceed to the page.

The nature of Dorset yesterday in tweets, charts, photographs and maps along with other sources of news of nature conservation and general wildlife interest:

  • Yesterday.s recorded sightings of mammals, birds, insects, plants and more
  • The current recording "hot-list" - the best recorded 30 species in the last 30 days
  • A map of sites where yesterdays records came from - what was seen near you?
  • Yesterday's records in graphical form to show the highlights
  • The pick of the photographs that came with the tweets
  • Interesting news items, notices of events and links to blogs
  • Links to the Nature of Dorset Daily newspaper and to various other blogs from Dorset conservation organisations

Everything you wanted to know and more ... and it's free of charge and free of adverts!

 

Published Date: Sunday, 18 March, 2018 - 09:30 newsdesk logo.jpg
Categories: Timeline, Twitter

9th April

Portland Bird Observatory - Mon, 04/09/2018 - 23:27
In most respects a day to forget in a hurry with rain, drizzle or fog throughout, although even in these dismal conditions there were tantalising hints that there was a surprising amount of diurnal passage afoot. Grounded migrants were really hard to get amongst but odds and ends of note at the Bill included 5 Redwings, 3 each of Firecrest and Brambling, and 2 each of Little Egret, Black Redstart and Bullfinch. The stalwarts venturing out tapped into frequent indications of migrants on the move overhead, with a sample 45 minute watch on the West Cliffs at the Bill coming up with 260 Meadow Pipits, 95 Linnets, 4 Swallows and 2 House Martins; singles of Whimbrel and Siskin were amongst the overflyers of interest at other times.

We were very pleased to have Nick Hopper back in residence over this last weekend to try his luck with some nocturnal recording. Sadly, both nights were disappointingly quiet - at least in terms of volume of passage - but both did come up with a few minor highlights: Friday/Saturday night (6th/7th April) produced singles of Grey Plover, Dunlin, Moorhen and Redwing, whilst Saturday/Sunday night (7th/8th April) chipped in with a small flock of Common Scoter, the first Common Sandpiper of the spring, 2 Dunlin, 2 Redwings and a nocturnal recording tick in the form of a Linnet at 02:45. We're often intrigued at how some of the finding from these nocturnal surveys are at variance with conventional wisdom when it comes to the temporal distribution of passage, for example, we usually think of spring Grey Plovers as being on the move in late April/early May when, for instance, they drop in at Ferrybridge or pass through during seawatches, but here's one on the move at night in early April:


You'd get the impression from our daytime censuses that both Moorhen and Coot are really unusual visitors to Portland but the nocturnal surveys keep revealing just how relatively frequent both are overhead at night - both must be really accomplished night migrants that rarely make mistakes and end up grounded in places they didn't mean to end up in. Nick's recording of Saturday morning's Moorhen is a particularly good one of an individual that took quite a while to pass over - presumably as it struggled in the stiff headwind that had developed at the time...

...the sonogram of this recording is also worth a look at:
Categories: Timeline, Twitter

Reports of interest, Monday 9th April 2018.

Dorset Bird Club - Mon, 04/09/2018 - 22:21
Spoonbill - 1 Stanpit.
Whimbrel - 1 Hengistbury Head.
Greenshank - 1 Brownsea Island.
Wheatear - 2 Hengistbury Head.
Lesser Whitethroat - 1 presumed blythi still at Reap Lane (Portland).
Blackcap - 10+ Stanpit (Purewell stream area).
Hawfinch - 40 Lower Bryanston.

Mediterranean Gull, Brownsea Island © Clinton Whale
Greenshank, Brownsea Island © Clinton Whale 
Categories: Timeline, Twitter

9 Apr 18

Martin Adlam - Mon, 04/09/2018 - 16:29
Ferrybridge

This afternoon, a single Swallow along Chesil Beach. I'm amazed it could see where it was flying.

A great day for birding - Not
Wakeham

This is what we've had all day.

Spot the bird!!!
Categories: Blogs, Timeline, Twitter

The nature of Dorset in tweets, charts, photos and maps ... 09-04-18

Nature of Dorset Records Timeline - Mon, 04/09/2018 - 08:07
Click/tap the logo to proceed to the page.

The nature of Dorset yesterday in tweets, charts, photographs and maps along with other sources of news of nature conservation and general wildlife interest:

  • Yesterday.s recorded sightings of mammals, birds, insects, plants and more
  • The current recording "hot-list" - the best recorded 30 species in the last 30 days
  • A map of sites where yesterdays records came from - what was seen near you?
  • Yesterday's records in graphical form to show the highlights
  • The pick of the photographs that came with the tweets
  • Interesting news items, notices of events and links to blogs
  • Links to the Nature of Dorset Daily newspaper and to various other blogs from Dorset conservation organisations

Everything you wanted to know and more ... and it's free of charge and free of adverts!

 

Published Date: Sunday, 18 March, 2018 - 09:30 newsdesk logo.jpg
Categories: Timeline, Twitter

8th April

Portland Bird Observatory - Mon, 04/09/2018 - 00:31
For a good part of the day it seemed as though Portland was close to the edge of rain creeping north across the Channel to the east of us but the threat rarely materialised into more than the odd outbreak of spitsy drizzle. Given the conditions it was a tad disappointing that more wasn't on the move along this weather boundary, with the weekend observers having to content themselves with no more than a small flurry amongst which 5 Firecrests, an Iceland Gull, the spring's first Whitethroat and another Hawfinch at the Bill and a Ring Ouzel lingering on at Barleycrates Lane were about the best on offer. Numbers at the Bill included 30 each of Blackcap and Chiffchaff but, for example, no more than 10 Willow Warblers and 4 Wheatears - the latter in particular have for the most part been really poorly represented so far this season. Long-stayers still about included the 'Eastern' Lesser Whitethroat at Southwell and at least 2 Short-eared Owls at the Bill. The sea ticked over without being ever busy, with 47 Common Scoter and singles of Red-throated Diver, Black-throated Diver, Canada Goose, Goosander and Arctic Skua through off the Bill and 2 Gadwall dropping in at Portland Harbour.

With so many white-winged gulls in Devon and Cornwall this year it's been a surprise how few have shown up at Portland, with today's Iceland Gull being the first of either species for over a month - there again, we were graced with the presence of the Ross's Gull which we'd take in compensation every time! © Roger Hewitt: 

Categories: Timeline, Twitter

Reports of interest, Sunday 8th April 2018.

Dorset Bird Club - Sun, 04/08/2018 - 22:39
Black-Throated Diver - 1 Durlston Head.
Red-Throated Diver - 2 Durlston Head.
Great White Egret - 1 Butterstreet Cove (The Fleet).
Spoonbill - 1 Stanpit.
Marsh Harrier - 1 Christchurch Harbour.
Iceland Gull - 1 Portland Bill.
Grey Plover - 1 Ferrybridge.
Knot - 1 Ferrybridge.
"Scandinavian" Rock Pipit - 3 Stanpit.
Lesser Whitethroat - 1 presumed blythi still at Reap Lane (Portland).
Firecrest - 1 Portland.
Brambling - 2 central Portland.
Hawfinch - 25 Lower Bryanston.

Siskin in a Lytchett Matravers garden © John Child 
Categories: Timeline, Twitter

8 Apr 18

Martin Adlam - Sun, 04/08/2018 - 16:38
Wakeham

For the third day running a Long-tailed Tit has visited the feeders in the back garden. Also about Great Tit, 2 Blue Tits, House Sparrows, Chaffinch and a pair of Collared Doves.

House Sparrow and Blue Tit
A pair of House Sparrows and a Great Tit
Long-tailed Tit
For the third day running a Long-tailed Tit has been visiting the feeders in the back garden.
Easy to tell these two Collared Doves apart as the male puffs out his chest.
Categories: Blogs, Timeline, Twitter

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