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31 Jul 18

Martin Adlam - Tue, 07/31/2018 - 18:03
Mermaid Track, Rufus Castle, St Andrews Church and Pennsylvania Castle Wood.

Summer is back after the last 2 days of rain and cloud, and this morning walk I had a walk along one of my favourite treks. There were quite a few butterfly species seen and because people keep telling me I'm misidentifying the Blue Butterfly species, from now on I shall just refer to them as "blue" butterflies.

So what was about, well lots of "blue" butterflies, 3 Commas, 2 Red Admirals, Large Whites, Green-veined whites, Gatekeepers and Meadow Browns.

For the second day running no Six-spot Burnet moths seen. I had 1 Silver Y and several micro moths.

Also seen were a Dark Bush-cricket (Pholidoptera griseoaptera), 7-spot Ladybird (Coccinella septempunctata) and 3 Migrant Hawkers, one along the Mermaid Track and two in the grounds of St Andrew's Church

Overhead at Rufus Castle, I had a noisy Peregrine Falcon, presumably a juvenile with one of the parents. Other birds of note were both Chiffchaff and another Autumn/juvenile yellow coloured Willow Warbler.

Here are few images from this morning in the order I took them along my walk.

A Red Admiral along the Mermaid Track
One of the 3 Migrant Hawkers seen today. This one was also along the Mermaid Track..........
..........as was this Dark Bush-cricket.
A moth to ID. This one was on the coast path on the way down to Rufus Castle.
Along the path I had a Gatekeeper.......
........and another "blue" butterfly.
Down the steps from Rufus Castle the Blackthorn (Sloe) is now in fruit.
They look absolutely perfect for picking.
Another "blue" butterfly this one on Penn's Weare Here
A Peregrine Falcon way way above my head.
A Meadow Brown also on Penn's Weare along...........
......with another "blue" butterfly.
Its not often you see so many boats and yachts in a line. This was looking out from Church Ope Cove.
A Silver Y comes into land.
And after a few seconds folds its wings up.
A Comma in the grounds of St Andrew's Church......
......where there were a few Wall Lizards.....
........basking in the sun.
Also here another "blue" Butterfly and......
......and worn Gatekeeper.
In Penn's Wood a 7-spot Ladybird
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26 Jul 18 - UK Sundews

Birding in Poole Harbour and Beyond - Tue, 07/31/2018 - 18:00
After seeing the Sooty Tern, I decided to head West to the Loch Garton area to look for some of the speciality Scottish Dragonflies: Azure Hawker (slim chance), Northern Emerald & Northern Damselfly. All of these would typically be still flying in the second half of July, although it was close to the end of their flying seasons. There were several sites in the Loch Garton area. By the time I arrived, it was early evening & had cooling down quite a bit. However, at least there was no sign of the cold Easterly breeze from the Ythan estuary. There were quite a few Emerald Damselflies going to roost in the long grass & sedges around the pools & a single Common Hawker, which was far too active.
Common Hawker: I was pleased to see this individual at Loch Garton, as I had been unsuccessfully looking for Common Hawkers on my Studland patch in the previous week (where they are a scarce species) (25 Jul 18)Emerald Damselfly: Female. There are no identification problems here as the other Emerald Damselfly species that occur in the South East of England haven't made it as far as Scotland (yet). Boat of Garton (25 Jul 18) The plan for the second day in Scotland had been to try getting out on a rib from Gairloch to look for Minke Whales, Short-beaked Common Dolphins & Harbour Porpoise. All three species were being seen regularly on the trips from Gairloch. Given it was a last minute trip to Scotland, I didn't have a booking, but thought I would try my luck by turning up first thing at Gairloch harbour. Not having a booking wasn't a problem, as due to the expectation of strong winds, all the rib trips for the day had been cancelled. Not deterred, I headed to the nearby coastline to the North of Gairloch where I could scan over the sea looking towards the Northern end of Skye & the distance island of Harris & Lewis. A good scan failed to produce any Cetaceans during the morning, but it was a great view. I will be back on a future Scottish trip.
The view looking towards Skye (to the left) and distantly Harris & Lewis (to the right of the photo)Gairloch is well placed for another of the good Scottish Dragonfly sites I wanted to visit. This was the Bridge of Grudie on Loch Maree which lies alongside the road to Gairloch. Again, the Dragonflies were disappointing with a reasonable number of Emerald Damselflies & a lone patrolling Common Hawker. It certainly seemed that the good summer has meant that the Scottish Summer speciality Dragonflies had gone over early. 
Loch Maree: Looking over to Slioch (3218 ft) which is one of the 282 Monros in the UKThe Sphagnum bog at Bridge of Grudie on the South East side of Loch MareeI was pleased to see there were some Sundews in the bogs at the Bridge of Grudie on the South Eastern side of Loch Maree. I've never been that interested in Flowers, except for Orchids. However, I am more interested in Sundews given they are carnivorous plants. These Sundews had long, thin leaves, instead of the small round leaves of Round-leaved Sundews. Checking the photos has confirmed that these were Great Sundews.
Great Sundew: I will have to look harder in locally as they also occur in the Dorset & New Forest bogs. They also occur on some of the East Anglian heaths, West Wales, the Northern Welsh borders & West ScotlandI am used to seeing Round-leaved Sundews around my local heathland bogs.
Round-leaved Sundew: This is a common species in the Dorset & New Forest bogs like these at Latchmore Brook in the New Forest (23 Jun 14)Round-leaved Sundew: They are also commonly found in Wales, the Lakes, the East Anglian coastal heaths & Scotland. These were photographed in Dorset (4 Aug 14)
Round-leaved Sundew: Showing how the sticky droplets trap insects like this unfortunate Large Red Damselfly which are ultimately digested. Foulshaw Mere (5 Jun 18)Finally, it was time to head home to Dorset. It was clear that I wasn't going to make it home in one journey without driving through the night, so I planned to find somewhere to kip en route. In the end the decision of where to stop was taken for me, as the M6 was closed in the Blackpool area & the warning signs as I headed South changed from a 2 hour to a 3 hour delay. Clearly, this looked like a major accident in the area. So, I decided to pull off the M6 as I passed the Lake District & head for Ullswater. There were a number of laybys next to the lake which looked quiet enough to get some sleep. It proved not only a good night's sleep, but an incredibly pretty view in the morning.
The view of Ullswater from the hotel window: I will have to explore this area on a future trip
The hotel was in need of a clean: Old school twitching hotel It clearly was a good idea to abandon the overnight drive home at Ullswater as the following morning, the M6 was still closed around Blackpool & there would have been very long delays in the area. I was well placed to pop over the Northern Pennines to Scotch Corner & drive home down the A1/M1 route.
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Reports of interest, Monday 30th July 2018.

Dorset Bird Club - Mon, 07/30/2018 - 22:02
Manx Shearwater - 68 Portland Bill.
Balearic Shearwater - 3 Portland Bill.
Great White Egret - 1 Lodmoor.
Whimbrel - 8 past Hengistbury sandspit, 6 Stanpit.
Green Sandpiper - 1 Lodmoor.
Curlew Sandpiper - 1 Stanpit.
Common Sandpiper - 3 Stanpit.
Spotted Redshank - 1 Stanpit.
Greenshank - 2 Holloway's Dock (Hengistbury).
Great Skua - 1 Portland Bill.
Arctic Skua - 1 past Hengistbury sandspit, 1 Portland Bill.
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Purple Emperor

Nature of Dorset Reference Database - Mon, 07/30/2018 - 21:31

An elusive species of ancient woodland, especially favours oak

 

Photograph by: Butterfly Conservation Dorset The records for this species have been organised into reports, charts, maps and photos. Click a pic below to see the detail: Sites List Distribution Map Distribution Map Some Charts Some Photographs Original Tweets Relatives Guidance Notes
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Nomad Bee (N flavopicta)

Nature of Dorset Reference Database - Mon, 07/30/2018 - 21:28

An uncommon nomad bee species

 

Photograph by: Colin Lamond The records for this species have been organised into reports, charts, maps and photos. Click a pic below to see the detail: Sites List Distribution Map Distribution Map Some Charts Some Photographs Original Tweets Relatives Guidance Notes
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Dance Fly (H grossipes)

Nature of Dorset Reference Database - Mon, 07/30/2018 - 21:26

There seem to be very few records for this species in the UK

 

 

Photograph by: Colin Lamond The records for this species have been organised into reports, charts, maps and photos. Click a pic below to see the detail: Sites List Distribution Map Distribution Map Some Charts Some Photographs Original Tweets Relatives Guidance Notes
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Blow Fly (C mortuorum)

Nature of Dorset Reference Database - Mon, 07/30/2018 - 21:23

Usually found around carrion and occasionally dung

 

Photograph by: Colin Lamond The records for this species have been organised into reports, charts, maps and photos. Click a pic below to see the detail: Sites List Distribution Map Distribution Map Some Charts Some Photographs Original Tweets Relatives Guidance Notes
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30th July

Portland Bird Observatory - Mon, 07/30/2018 - 21:22
As yesterdays tempest slowly ameliorated into a blustery but otherwise clear day, the numbers of seabirds calmed and migration over the land began to pick up again. As far as Moths were concerned, we were firmly back to the old faithfuls.

Portland Bill Swift 14, Sand Martin 2, House Martin 2, Willow Warbler 8, Raven 6.

Portland Bill Seawatch Manx Shearwater 68, Balearic Shearwater 3, Arctic Skua 1, Bonxie 1, Yellow-legged Gull 16, Mediterranean Gull 41, Guillemot 1, Sandwich Tern 1, Kittiwake 16, Curlew 1.

Ferrybridge Mediterranean Gull 595 (130 juveniles).

Moths Silver Y 2, Rusty-dot Pearl 3, Diamond-back Moth 5.

Juvenile Whitethroats are comprising the majority of the catch at the moment, particularly in the Crown Estate Fields where the species seem to have had a bumper year. 

The Bill Quarry Wheatears seem to be determined to moult into Wallcreepers...
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Channel Islands Pug

Nature of Dorset Reference Database - Mon, 07/30/2018 - 21:19

A scarce recent coloniser found only near its food plant, tamarisk

 

Photograph by: John Down The records for this species have been organised into reports, charts, maps and photos. Click a pic below to see the detail: Sites List Distribution Map Distribution Map Some Charts Some Photographs Original Tweets Relatives Guidance Notes
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Barred Rivulet

Nature of Dorset Reference Database - Mon, 07/30/2018 - 21:17

A local species usually found on open ground where red bartsia and eyebright grow

 

Photograph by: Debby Saunders The records for this species have been organised into reports, charts, maps and photos. Click a pic below to see the detail: Sites List Distribution Map Distribution Map Some Charts Some Photographs Original Tweets Relatives Guidance Notes
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Chalk Carpet

Nature of Dorset Reference Database - Mon, 07/30/2018 - 21:15

Often seen by day on calcareous cliffs and quarries usually near the coast

 

Photograph by: Debby Saunders The records for this species have been organised into reports, charts, maps and photos. Click a pic below to see the detail: Sites List Distribution Map Distribution Map Some Charts Some Photographs Original Tweets Relatives Guidance Notes
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Iron Prominent

Nature of Dorset Reference Database - Mon, 07/30/2018 - 21:12

Widespread near birch and alder which the larvae feed on

 

Photograph by: Debby Saunders The records for this species have been organised into reports, charts, maps and photos. Click a pic below to see the detail: Sites List Distribution Map Distribution Map Some Charts Some Photographs Original Tweets Relatives Guidance Notes
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Chaffweed

Nature of Dorset Reference Database - Mon, 07/30/2018 - 21:10

A tiny plant found on bare patches of ground on sandy, damp heathland

 

Photograph by: Retweet The records for this species have been organised into reports, charts, maps and photos. Click a pic below to see the detail: Sites List Distribution Map Distribution Map Some Charts Some Photographs Original Tweets Relatives Guidance Notes
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Cinnamon Bug

Nature of Dorset Reference Database - Mon, 07/30/2018 - 21:07

Mainly a coastal species of grasslands, scrub and gardens

 

Photograph by: Charlie Richardson The records for this species have been organised into reports, charts, maps and photos. Click a pic below to see the detail: Sites List Distribution Map Distribution Map Some Charts Some Photographs Original Tweets Relatives Guidance Notes
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30 Jul 18

Martin Adlam - Mon, 07/30/2018 - 19:34
Mermaid Track and Bumpers Lane

A late afternoon walk in the sun. The heavy rain from yesterday fizzled out in the early hours of this morning, leaving a cloudy start to the day. Still quite windy, but temperatures high enough that you didn't need a jacket.

Main highlight was the number of Chalk Hill Blues out along the Mermaid Track. There must have been a good dozen or more males with a couple of females in amongst them. A complete contrast to their usual patch along Bumpers Lane where all I could find was a pair. I say a pair they were actually a good 50 metres apart.

I know butterflies like moths can vary in size, but one female Chalk Hill Blue was almost half the size of the other females. Most odd.

Other butterflies seen were a couple of Red Admirals, a Large White, 2 Ringlets and a Gatekeeper.

On the moth front no Six-spot Burnet or Silver Y's found, but I did come across a Mint Moth.

Also recorded were Common Field Grasshoppers (Chorthippus brunneus), Common Green Grasshoppers (Omocestus viridulus), 2 Common Dronefly (Eristalis tenax) and a Syrphus sp. hoverfly.

Here are few images from this afternoon:

A Red Admiral along the Mermaid Track
Also along here a Ringlet in its usual sitting position..........
.........so it was nice change to see this one open its wings for me. Not a sight you normally see.
A male Chalk Hill Blue
And a worn female Chalk Hill Blue!
Now this one has me completely bamboozled. I'm going to say a female Chalk Hill Blue..........
........but its half the size of the female above!!!
A lone Gatekeeper.
Along Bumpers Lane, this patch of short grass last year was absolutely covered in Chalk Hill Blues.
This year one female.
And a tatty one at that.
And a good 50 metres away a male. And that was it.
A Mint moth
Common Dronefly
And a hoverfly. Closest I can get is a Syrphus sp.
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Parasitic Fly (L vulpina)

Nature of Dorset Reference Database - Mon, 07/30/2018 - 18:45

A widespread heathland species

 

Photograph by: Colin Lamond The records for this species have been organised into reports, charts, maps and photos. Click a pic below to see the detail: Sites List Distribution Map Distribution Map Some Charts Some Photographs Original Tweets Relatives Guidance Notes
Categories: Timeline, Twitter

Ground Beetle (C nitens)

Nature of Dorset Reference Database - Mon, 07/30/2018 - 18:41

A rare species of wet heathlands

 

Photograph by: Retweet The records for this species have been organised into reports, charts, maps and photos. Click a pic below to see the detail: Sites List Distribution Map Distribution Map Some Charts Some Photographs Original Tweets Relatives Guidance Notes
Categories: Timeline, Twitter

Cliff Tiger Beetle

Nature of Dorset Reference Database - Mon, 07/30/2018 - 18:38

Very rare species found on clay undercliffs on the south coast

 

Photograph by: James Phillips The records for this species have been organised into reports, charts, maps and photos. Click a pic below to see the detail: Sites List Distribution Map Distribution Map Some Charts Some Photographs Original Tweets Relatives Guidance Notes
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Southern Migrant Hawker

Nature of Dorset Reference Database - Mon, 07/30/2018 - 18:36

A European species that is spreading its range northwards and now occurs more frequently in Britain

 

Photograph by: Ian Ballam The records for this species have been organised into reports, charts, maps and photos. Click a pic below to see the detail: Sites List Distribution Map Distribution Map Some Charts Some Photographs Original Tweets Relatives Guidance Notes
Categories: Timeline, Twitter

Robber Fly (N cyanurus)

Nature of Dorset Reference Database - Mon, 07/30/2018 - 18:30

Found on vegetation along rides in ancient woodlands

 

Photograph by: Colin Lamond The records for this species have been organised into reports, charts, maps and photos. Click a pic below to see the detail: Sites List Distribution Map Distribution Map Some Charts Some Photographs Original Tweets Relatives Guidance Notes
Categories: Timeline, Twitter

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