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Hoverfly (H trivittatus)

Nature of Dorset Reference Database - Thu, 06/14/2018 - 08:02

 

A migratory species found along the coast or larger rivers

 

Photograph by: Edmund Mackrill The records for this species have been organised into reports, charts, maps and photos. Click a pic below to see the detail: Sites List Distribution Map Distribution Map Some Charts Some Photographs Original Tweets Relatives Guidance Notes
Categories: Timeline, Twitter

The nature of Dorset in tweets, charts, photos and maps ... 13-06-18

Nature of Dorset Records Timeline - Thu, 06/14/2018 - 07:54
Click/tap the logo to proceed to the page.

The nature of Dorset yesterday in tweets, charts, photographs and maps along with other sources of news of nature conservation and general wildlife interest:

  • Yesterday.s recorded sightings of mammals, birds, insects, plants and more
  • The current recording "hot-list" - the best recorded 30 species in the last 30 days
  • A map of sites where yesterdays records came from - what was seen near you?
  • Yesterday's records in graphical form to show the highlights
  • The pick of the photographs that came with the tweets
  • Interesting news items, notices of events and links to blogs
  • Links to the Nature of Dorset Daily newspaper and to various other blogs from Dorset conservation organisations

Everything you wanted to know and more ... and it's free of charge and free of adverts!

 

Published Date: Monday, 25 December, 2017 - 09:30 newsdesk logo.jpg
Categories: Timeline, Twitter

13th June

Portland Bird Observatory - Thu, 06/14/2018 - 00:53
With the expected break down of the recent fair weather holding off until late in the afternoon there was ample opportunity for coverage today, with two nice highlights providing equally ample evidence for what can still drop in at this time of year: a crack of dawn Rosy Starling was a brief visitor to Blacknor (with a later report of one flying over at the Bill), whilst a Golden Oriole was in song for a while during the morning at Culverwell. A Reed Warbler was also of note at the Bill where 50 Common Scoter passed through on the sea. Overnight, 9 more Storm Petrels had been sound-lured and trapped at the Bill.

The overnight immigrant/dispersing moth tally at the Obs consisted of just 4 Silver Y, 3 each of Green Oak Tortrix and Rusty-dot Pearl, and 2 Diamond-back Moth.

The Golden Oriole was singing - and calling - quite well at times but afforded no more than the odd glimpse as it flashed between trees; we did get a few recordings of it, a snippet of which we've overlayed onto a bit of scene-setting video (...you probably shouldn't really say such things but it was one of those moments on an idyllically balmy morning when you think: 'Blimey, we're getting paid to do this!') © Martin Cade:

By Portland standards, we've had a pretty successful start to the Storm Petrel season with 20 birds trapped over the last couple of nights (getting paid to also get dangerously sleep-deprived might seem like a perverse thing to want to do but there's something so compelling and exciting about petrel-catching that we can't help but to keep going back for more of it). The most interesting of these was the recapture of a bird that we'd first ringed in June 2015; we've had a few subsequent year retraps in the past but never one from as long ago as three years - in all probability these records refer to wandering immatures but we've always wondered if there isn't actually a chance that Storm Petrel might breed at somewhere like West Weare where there's a wealth of seemingly suitable habitat © Martin Cade:
Categories: Timeline, Twitter

Sightings - Wednesday 13th June 2018.

Dorset Bird Club - Wed, 06/13/2018 - 19:49
Whooper Swan - 1 Abbotsbury Swannery
Storm Petrel - 9 Trapped - Portland (last night)
Grey Plover - 1 Lytchett Fields RSPB
Green Sandpiper - 1 Lytchett Fields RSPBGreenshank - 1 Lytchett Fields RSPB
Short eared Owl - 1 Portland
Rose coloured Starling - 1 Blacknor Estate, Portland
Golden Oriole - 1 Culverwell, Portland
Categories: Timeline, Twitter

13 Jun 18

Martin Adlam - Wed, 06/13/2018 - 18:53
Wakeham

Another busy day at home, only highlight today was a large congregation of Swifts moving slowly northwards. Probably a good 30 birds on passage!

Also noted was a Chiffchaff singing again from the neighbours garden, where there was also a few baby Wrens being fed. Only butterfly seen was a Painted Lady, which passed over the back garden.
Categories: Blogs, Timeline, Twitter

5 Apr 18 - Atlantic Odyssey - Day Eight: At Sea From South Georgia To Gough Island

Birding in Poole Harbour and Beyond - Wed, 06/13/2018 - 18:00
After three very hectic days around South Georgia, we were back out at sea & would not see the next land, Gough Island, until the late afternoon of the fifth day. Therefore, as the sea was relatively rough, then it was a good day to relax a bit & catch up on some of the lost sleep from the previous few days. As a result of the more relaxed day, I didn't do a lot of photography, but did I manage to photograph the only Tick I saw that day.
Sooty Albatross: An atmospheric shot to indicate that some days the weather wasn't great in the South AtlanticThere were a few more Birds around on following day including my first Spectacled Petrels & a Cattle Egret on the Plancius. However, I was still taking it easy & still trying to get rid of the ship's cold that had been circulating around the Plancius for the last few days. Therefore, the cameras stayed in the cabin.
Categories: Blogs, Timeline, Twitter

The nature of Dorset in tweets, charts, photos and maps ... 12-06-18

Nature of Dorset Records Timeline - Wed, 06/13/2018 - 08:25
Click/tap the logo to proceed to the page.

The nature of Dorset yesterday in tweets, charts, photographs and maps along with other sources of news of nature conservation and general wildlife interest:

  • Yesterday.s recorded sightings of mammals, birds, insects, plants and more
  • The current recording "hot-list" - the best recorded 30 species in the last 30 days
  • A map of sites where yesterdays records came from - what was seen near you?
  • Yesterday's records in graphical form to show the highlights
  • The pick of the photographs that came with the tweets
  • Interesting news items, notices of events and links to blogs
  • Links to the Nature of Dorset Daily newspaper and to various other blogs from Dorset conservation organisations

Everything you wanted to know and more ... and it's free of charge and free of adverts!

 

Published Date: Monday, 25 December, 2017 - 09:30 newsdesk logo.jpg
Categories: Timeline, Twitter

12th June

Portland Bird Observatory - Tue, 06/12/2018 - 22:29
The smallest of pulses of late passage included a nice highlight in the form of a Golden Oriole that was flushed from the Obs Quarry but couldn't be found again; other arrivals/movers included singles of Whinchat and Reed Warbler at the Bill, 8 Mediterranean Gulls through off the Bill, a Hobby through at Blacknor and 14 Dunlin and 2 Whimbrel at Ferrybridge. Overnight, a total of 11 Storm Petrels were sound-lured and trapped at the Bill.

The first Marbled Whites of the year were on the wing at Southwell.

A small increase in immigrant/dispersing moths saw 19 Diamond-back Moth, 8 Silver Y and singles of Green Oak Tortrix, Rusty-dot Pearl, Orange Footman and Cream-bordered Green Pea; a similar variety from other sites included a White Satin caught at Reap Lane.

Late news for yesterday: 2 Red-veined Darter dragonflies were seen briefly in different spots at the Bill.

Fulmar at Southwell today © Pete Saunders... 


...and a Silver-studded Blue from Broadcroft BC reserve © Ken Dolbear: 

Categories: Timeline, Twitter

Sightings - Tuesday 12th June 2018.

Dorset Bird Club - Tue, 06/12/2018 - 22:27
Whooper Swan - 1 Abbotsbury Swannery
Storm Petrel - 10 Trapped at Portland Bill (last night)
Red Kite - 1 Martinstown, 1 Cerne Abbas
Common Crane - 2  flew east over Fiddleford Mill 
Golden Oriole - 1 Observatory Quarry, Portland


Fledgling Peregrine, Bournemouth © David Wareham



Sandwich Tern, Brownsea Island © Clinton Whale


Categories: Timeline, Twitter

12 Jun 18

Martin Adlam - Tue, 06/12/2018 - 22:18
Wakeham

Our quiet day spent gardening, main highlight was watching 3 Common Buzzards drifting northwards over the island. Summer migrants from the continent. Possibly!!

The new pond in the back garden has been a success story with Semaphore flies (Poecilobothrus nobilitatus) displaying all day long. Well pleased with the pond. I wonder what future years hold.

A pair of Herring Gulls nesting between the chimney pots on a neighbours roof have successfully hatched a chick and after two weeks it is doing very well. This time last year one of the parent birds was a ringed adult nicknamed Bo. This was her on 9 Jun 17 Here.

Having said that I have a real suspicion Bo has gone and another pair are using the old nest site. I will keep checking.

A Chiffchaff was singing from the neighbours garden for the 3rd day running and a few Swifts passed overhead heading north. The "local" birds have fallen silent!!

Here are a few images from today.

The new pond has certainly been a success story and the first real residents have been Semaphore flies (Poecilobothrus nobilitatus).
I photographed the Semaphore Fly in the bottom right hand corner and as I was editing the image I realised there were a further two in the top left-hand corner.
This one is on a Nasturtium leaf.
Another on a pebble.
And another on a rock.
One of the adult Herring Gulls nesting on the neighbours roof.
This year just a single chick. Last year there were 2 and sadly they both perished. All I've got to do know is see if Bo is still the mother or whether another female has taken her place.
Categories: Blogs, Timeline, Twitter

5 June 18 - Northern Triathlon: Part Three

Birding in Poole Harbour and Beyond - Tue, 06/12/2018 - 18:00
This Post covers the third part of my Northern Triathlon. The first part of the Triathlon was seeing my first Mountain Ringlets at Irton Fell & the second part of the Triathlon was seeing my first White-faced Darters at Foulshaw Moss. The final part of the Triathlon was to try & see my first Lady's Slipper Orchids. A few days earlier, I had seen a Post from fellow blogger & mate Ewan Urquhart who had recently seen Lady Slipper Orchids at Gait Barrows National Nature Reserve, on a stop over on the way back from twitching a Walrus in Scotland. As usual, Ewan's Post was full of enthusiasm & nice photos. Looking at the location, I confirmed it was in Southern Cumbria, so there was a chance of being able to combine it with a trip to look for Mountain Ringlet. The only problem was would they be over. Ewan had seen them in late May & the Mountain Ringlets are early June at their first site at Irton Fell. Once I decided on the date to head off for the Mountain Ringlets, I double-checked the Lady's Slipper Orchid directions & confirmed I was likely to go right past the site. So all I needed to do was to find the time in a fairly busy day & hope they were still in good condition. This was more complicated as I was now planning to visit Foulshaw Moss to look for their White-faced Darters.
Gait Barrows National Nature ReserveGait Barrows NNR looks to be an interesting reserve & one that the flying visit that I was planning was far too short. However, I am fortunate that many of the other Spring Butterflies, that the reserve is home to, also occur in Dorset. It took a bit of driving up & down country lanes to find the reserve as I hadn't prepared a complete set of directions. But after a bit of searching I spotted the subtly marked entrance to one of the car parks. My timing was perfect as there were a couple of locals who had been taking visiting friends to see the Lady's Slipper Orchids, so I could double-check my directions. Fortunately, this confirmed my onsite directions were accurate & they said there were still two plants that were in good condition. It was less than a 15 minute gentle walk to the exact site.
Gait Barrows: There are a number of areas of open limestone clearings within the woodThey were easy to find once I reached the clearing: the roped off area helped to pick out the plants.
Lady's Slipper Orchid: The roped off area meant I didn't have to spend too much time lookingLady's Slipper Orchid: Although roped off to avoid accidental disturbance, the rope is high enough so not to cause a big problem for photographersLady's Slipper Orchid: Unfortunately, most of the plants had already gone over, but two were still in good conditionLady's Slipper Orchid: They are great looking OrchidsLady's Slipper Orchid: The flowers are stunningLady's Slipper Orchids occur in temperate locations from Europe all the way across to Asia, although they are becoming scarcer in Europe. Their status in the UK has been even more precarious. Victorian collectors wiped it out in the UK & it was declared extinct in 1917. Then in 1930, a single plant was discovered at a private site in Yorkshire. There were also two known plants in captivity that had been taken from the wild before the plant had been declared extinct. After a lot of work with the surviving plants by Kew Gardens, Kew succeeded in cultivating seedlings. In 1989, Kew were able to start reintroducing seedlings back into the wild. The seedlings had been re-established at a number of suitable sites in the UK. However, only Gait Burrows has been publicly disclosed to allow ongoing protection to the remaining locations. Sadly, there are a number of maverick individuals who still think it's better for them to dig up plants for their own private collections.
Categories: Blogs, Timeline, Twitter

Celebrate nature with the Big Wild Weekend in Dorset

Dorset Wildlife Trust - Tue, 06/12/2018 - 15:59

Dorset Wildlife Trust (DWT) is taking part in the first ever Big Wild Weekend on Saturday 16th and Sunday 17th June, which is part of the Wildlife Trusts’ nationwide 30 Days Wild initiative.

Categories: Twitter

The nature of Dorset in tweets, charts, photos and maps ... 11-06-18

Nature of Dorset Records Timeline - Tue, 06/12/2018 - 08:29
Click/tap the logo to proceed to the page.

The nature of Dorset yesterday in tweets, charts, photographs and maps along with other sources of news of nature conservation and general wildlife interest:

  • Yesterday.s recorded sightings of mammals, birds, insects, plants and more
  • The current recording "hot-list" - the best recorded 30 species in the last 30 days
  • A map of sites where yesterdays records came from - what was seen near you?
  • Yesterday's records in graphical form to show the highlights
  • The pick of the photographs that came with the tweets
  • Interesting news items, notices of events and links to blogs
  • Links to the Nature of Dorset Daily newspaper and to various other blogs from Dorset conservation organisations

Everything you wanted to know and more ... and it's free of charge and free of adverts!

 

Published Date: Monday, 25 December, 2017 - 09:30 newsdesk logo.jpg
Categories: Timeline, Twitter

11 Jun 18

Martin Adlam - Mon, 06/11/2018 - 23:57
Wakeham

After an eventful morning at Radipole, it was a relaxing afternoon in the back garden. A few interesting sightings with my first Broad-bodied Chaser (Libellula depressa), a female visiting the pond.

A female Broad-bodied Chaser
Radipole RSPB Nature Reserve

Having dropped Dawn off at Chickerell for her Charity walk for Teenage Cancer Trust, I headed off to Radipole Reserve. I parked in my usual spot in Goldcroft Avenue Here and crossed the Dorchester Road and into the Reserve. I decided to head for the North Screen first and then walk around the rest of the reserve later.

That never actually happened as I only made it to the screen and back as there were so many bugs, bees and hoverflies etc. seen en route. I think if I'd visited the rest of the reserve I would still be writing out my report for several days.

Below are a few images from this mornings walk. There were many invertebrates and unfortunately today I was well beaten by many that I have not been able to ID.

So much vegetation............
...........and absolutely filled with invertebrates. Its no wonder there's a healthy population of Chiffchaff, Lesser Whitethroat, Common Whitethroat, Sedge, Reed and Cetti's Warblers here. And that's just our summer visitors.

A Marsh Harriers surveys his territory.
A Grey Heron
A young Coot begs for food.
I know I've said this before, but there are, unusually for a wetland reserve, a good head of House Sparrows here. Chirpy chappy and always a pleasure to see and hear them, especially with population numbers dropping.

An Orchid.......
........Marsh, Early, Southern. One of these I'm sure. One to check.
This is a Snipe Fly, Chrysopilus cristatus........
.....they were everywhere, so I thought I'd add a few more images below.
Another.
And another.
And last one.
A small Dagger Fly. Smaller than Empis tessellata, but as to which one, I'm not sure.
Struggling to ID this, but it does look like one I came across in Swindon. One to check also.
This is the Noon Fly - Mesembrina meridiana
The Footballer hoverfly - Helophilus pendulus.
Despite this individual being a lot smaller, I think this is also Helophilus pendulus...........
..............and this one to.
This looks good for the hoverfly - Myathropa florea
Another hoverfly...........
...........Eristalis arbustorum
Another one to ID. Not doing to well with all these new bugs!!
This is the hoverfly Xylota segnis
This is a Mimic Bee Hoverfly - Volucella plumata. However the black thorax doesn't look right and examples I have seen have yellow hairs along the sides!

This is an Early Bumblebee, Bombus pratorum
An Ichneumon Wasp, but one to ID
Another view.
I'm not doing to well ID'ing the "bugs" from today..............
.......but I'm pretty sure this is the Ichneumon Wasp Achaius oratorius
Well this is a Sawfly and a very small one at that. There were dozens along the path on the way to the North Screen. Unfortunately it isn't one I'm gong to ID.
There were several Blue-tailed Damselfly, Ischnura elegans along the pathway
Here is another
And one more
A Common Blue Damselfly, Enallagma cyathigerum
And another
another
and another male............
.........and finally a female
A Banded Demoiselle, Calopteryx splendens
Incredible colours. More on this Demoiselle Here
A 14-spot Ladybird, Propylea 14-punctata
And one with a few more spots a 22-spot Ladybird, Psyllobora 22-punctata
A caterpillar tent........
...........the species, to be ID'd.
It would be true to say that I am struggling to ID these caterpillars. This is another one to ID.
One I do know the caterpillar of the Garden Tiger moth (Arctia caja)
A male Swollen-thighed Beetle - Oedemera nobilis
A pair of Nettle Weevil (Phyllobius pomaceus), doing what Nettle Weevils do
I'm not 100% sure but I'm going for Common Fox-spider - Alopecosa pulverulenta  
It looks like I'm also beaten by this snail. One of these maybe Here
Categories: Blogs, Timeline, Twitter

11th June

Portland Bird Observatory - Mon, 06/11/2018 - 22:15
Very little to report on the bird front with no new migrants on the land and just 17 Manx Shearwaters and 10 Common Scoter through on the sea at the Bill. 
Overnight conditions were again very good for moth-trapping but seemingly less than helpful for immigration and dispersal; immigrant totals at the Obs were 17 Silver Y, 6 Diamond-back Moth, 4 Rusty-dot Pearl and the first Delicate of the year.
Although the lesson of history is that there's still a long way to go before we can rest easy that there isn't a late spring rarity lurking somewhere, the feel over the last couple of days is that the forecast upcoming break down in the current long settled spell of weather won't do any harm; in the meanwhile the conditions have been lovely - if pretty unrewarding - for at least being out looking; Kestrel © Dan Law: 


Although a lot of our moth-trapping just recently has involved making the most of the nice conditions by getting out and about inland the static moth traps around the island have been pretty busy; with one or two exceptions immigration has been a bit of a non-event but there are plenty of nice local specials on the wing now, including Portland Ribbon Wave © Debby Saunders...


...and Samphire Knot-horn Epischnia asteris © Martin Cade:

Categories: Timeline, Twitter

Sightings - Monday 11th June 2018.

Dorset Bird Club - Mon, 06/11/2018 - 21:37
Spoonbill - 1 Stanpit Marsh, Christchurch Harbour
Osprey - 1 Wareham Channel
Red Kite - 1 Litton Cheney 
Ringed Plover - 2 Lytchett Fields RSPB
Lapwing - 12 Lytchett Fields RSPB
Grey Plover - 1 Lytchett Fields RSPB
Redshank - 7 Lytchett Fields RSPB
Black tailed Godwit - 80 Lytchett Fields RSPB

Peregrines, Bournemouth © David Wareham

Categories: Timeline, Twitter

Nightjar walk

Dorset Bird Club - Mon, 06/11/2018 - 21:31
Friday 15th June 2018   Nightjar and Woodcock walk - Leader: Trevor Thorpe   White Sheet Plantation, near Wimborne 19:30 – dusk. Meet in the car park on the bend in the road (SU 048036). Category A.
Categories: Timeline, Twitter

5 June 18 - Northern Triathlon: Part Two

Birding in Poole Harbour and Beyond - Mon, 06/11/2018 - 18:00
This Post covers the second part of my Northern Triathlon to try to see my first White-faced Darters at Foulshaw Moss. The first part of the Triathlon was seeing my first Mountain Ringlets at Irton Fell. When I was doing the final planning for the trip, I was considering whether it would be possible to combine the Mountain Ringlet trip with looking for White-faced Darters at Whixall Moss in Shropshire. However, one of the first responses I saw on google was for White-faced Darters at Foulshaw Moss in Cumbria. This blog confirmed they had been flying since late May. I had forgotten there were Cumbrian sites. A bit of further searching online confirmed the site details & the White-faced Darters at Foulshaw Moss were the result of a successful re-introduction to the reserve. I am happy to consider looking at successful re-introductions into documented recent native range. Therefore, combining Foulshaw Moss into the Triathlon looked to be the obvious option. Even better I would be driving right past the entrance road to Foulshaw Moss.
Foulshaw Moss: Foulshaw Moss is an excellent looking Cumbria Wildlife Trust reserveFoulshaw Moss: The reserve covers a large area of lowland peat bog which is a rare English habitatFoulshaw Moss: The peat bog is fairly extensiveFoulshaw MossFoulshaw Moss: This drier part of the peat bog had patches of Cotton GrassFoulshaw Moss: There were also areas of trees that had become established on the peat bogThe reserve has several hundred metres of boardwalks which allows access to the Northern part of the reserve. The boardwalk passes past a number of excellent small & medium sized ponds amongst the trees, all of which were very busy with Dragonflies. This included several hundred Four-spotted Chasers, as well as, a few hundred Azure Damselflies.
Four-spotted Chaser: This one shows the top of its-white facial patternFour Spotted ChaserFour-spotted Chaser: The pools within the woodland had plenty of these atmospheric perches for the DragonfliesFour-spotted Chaser: The numbers of Four-spotted Chasers on the reserve was the highest I've seenFour-spotted Chaser
Four-spotted Chaser: Showing its white face which was why more than one person present misidentified the commoner Four-spotted Chasers as White-faced Darters
Blue-tailed Damselfly: This was the only one I saw
Azure Damselfly: I saw at least a couple of hundred
Azure Damselfly: There were good numbers egg laying
Round-leaved Sundew
Round-leaved Sundew: This Large Red Damselfly's luck has run outAfter an hour of looking, I hadn't seen any White-faced Darters. All I knew was that they had been photographed somewhere on the boardwalk. Knowing that they are only on a limited number of pools at Whixall Moss that they like, I assumed that I still needed to keep walking along the boardwalk to find the correct micro habitat. After several hundred metres the boardwalk emerged from the flooded forest across more open peat bog. There were a couple of viewpoints, one of which was raised, from which it was possible to see the distant trees in the bog where there was a pair of nesting Ospreys. This was the main highlight for the reserve. However, I was looking for something with six legs, not six legs spread over three baby Ospreys. I did have brief look though a volunteer's telescope, but the nest was distant & the female was sitting low in the nest. The volunteer didn't know a lot about the White-faced Darters, but he did say that they had been seen around his lower viewpoint. This was reinforced by some locals who arrived & were also looking for the White-faced Darters. The lady promptly walked off the boardwalk to look at the pool beyond. She was quickly stopped by the volunteer as the Wildlife Trust quite rightly do not want people walking around off the boardwalk. It's quite amazing that some people just don't know how to behave on a nature reserve. But this did at least confirm the place I should be looking. I did see a probable White-faced Darter soon after quite a way out onto the bog, but quickly lost it & it didn't reappear.
Large Heath: I saw at least 8 here, but they were all active in the sunshine. This was the only photo I managed to get when one briefly landedI thought I would have a quick look at the raised viewpoint to see it that looked promising for White-faced Darters as it was only 50 metres away. This was surrounded by another pond, but didn't have the Cotton Grass that the lower viewpoint pond had. A White-faced Darter was claimed by another visitor, but when I checked it, it was a Four-spotted Chaser. Four-spotted Chasers have an off-whitish front to the face, which can be confusing when you initially see one flying towards you. However, checking the rest of the markings on the abdomen & wings, then there is no confusion between Four-spotted Chasers & White-faced Darters. Four-spotted Chasers are also a different shape with a distinctive wide, flat abdomen, rather than the narrow, rounded abdomen of White-faced Darters. So it was time to head back to the Cotton Grass pond by the lower viewpoint. Fortunately, another guy had now appeared who also knew his local Dragonflies. He said he had seen several White-faced Darters flying around & occasionally landing on the distant pond. He borrowed another guy's telescope & after a couple of minutes, pointed out one that was perched up. A bit too far for a photo, but it was clearly a male White-faced Darter when it was my turn to take a look through the scope. All that was needed now was a bit of patience. About 15 minutes later, I picked up a White-faced Darter that flew over the boardwalk. It was  close to where we were standing, but didn't stop for a photo. Ten minutes later, another male White-faced Darter appeared & this time it landed on the boardwalk allowing some photos. It hung around the boardwalk & eventually became a bit more approachable. Finally, it settled on some natural vegetation for a better looking photo. It was now late afternoon & I needed to head off for the final part of my Northern Triathlon.
White-faced Darter: Male. My penultimate breeding English Dragonfly Tick. I just need to see Southern Emerald, as well as, the four Scottish speciality DragonfliesWhite-faced Darter: Male. The white face is very distinctive when seen properlyWhite-faced Darter: Male. Males are the only black & red Darter. Bright yellow replaces the red in females with additional yellow at the base of the abdomenWhite-faced Darter: Male. The nearest they get to Dorset is Whixall Moss in ShropshireWhite-faced Darter: Male. Finally a natural background photoArtificial Osprey nest: Almost the nearest I got to actually seeing the Osprey's was this artificial Osprey nest close to the car park (although I also saw the nest in use). The reserve has cameras on the real nest so visitors can see the latest action. I walked past the visitors hut, in my hurry to looked for the Dragonflies. I intended to stop on the way back. However, it was all shut up when I reached the car park at 17:00
Categories: Blogs, Timeline, Twitter

10th June

Portland Bird Observatory - Mon, 06/11/2018 - 11:37
On an increasingly warm and sunny day the only migrant interest concerned 2 more new Chiffchaffs at the Obs, a Hobby thorough at Southwell, 25 Common Scoter through off the Bill and 3 Dunlin at Ferrybridge.

Although the moth-traps remain very busy with resident fare there seems to be very little immigration afoot: 9 Rusty-dot Pearl, 7 Diamond-back Moth and 5 Silver Y constituted the night's tally at the Obs.
Categories: Timeline, Twitter

Spotted Shoot Moth

Nature of Dorset Reference Database - Sun, 06/10/2018 - 21:25

Associated with scots pine and so quite common in the Poole basin although not often seen 

 

Photograph by: Mark Andrews The records for this species have been organised into reports, charts, maps and photos. Click a pic below to see the detail: Sites List Distribution Map Distribution Map Some Charts Some Photographs Original Tweets Relatives Guidance Notes
Categories: Timeline, Twitter

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