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White Stork (Ciconia ciconia)

Steve Carey - Tue, 06/05/2018 - 10:38
White Stork (Ciconia ciconia)Tudela NavarreSpain5th June 2018
Categories: Blogs, Timeline, Twitter

Black Kite (Milvus migrans)

Steve Carey - Tue, 06/05/2018 - 10:35
Black Kite (Milvus migrans)Carretera de Elorz Noáin NavarraSpain5th June 2018
Categories: Blogs, Timeline, Twitter

The nature of Dorset in tweets, charts, photos and maps ... 04-06-18

Nature of Dorset Records Timeline - Tue, 06/05/2018 - 06:53
Click/tap the logo to proceed to the page.

The nature of Dorset yesterday in tweets, charts, photographs and maps along with other sources of news of nature conservation and general wildlife interest:

  • Yesterday.s recorded sightings of mammals, birds, insects, plants and more
  • The current recording "hot-list" - the best recorded 30 species in the last 30 days
  • A map of sites where yesterdays records came from - what was seen near you?
  • Yesterday's records in graphical form to show the highlights
  • The pick of the photographs that came with the tweets
  • Interesting news items, notices of events and links to blogs
  • Links to the Nature of Dorset Daily newspaper and to various other blogs from Dorset conservation organisations

Everything you wanted to know and more ... and it's free of charge and free of adverts!

 

Published Date: Monday, 25 December, 2017 - 09:30 newsdesk logo.jpg
Categories: Timeline, Twitter

4th June

Portland Bird Observatory - Tue, 06/05/2018 - 00:22
Just a small selection of fairly routine late migrants to report today: 3 Chiffchaffs, 2 each of Reed Warbler and Blackcap, and singles of Hobby and Spotted Flycatcher at the Bill, a Yellow Wagtail over Blacknor and 17 Sanderling at Ferrybridge.

A bumper catch of moths at the Obs included a Many-lined - the first island record for 12 years; the accompanying tally of more routine fare was a less than impressive 7 Diamond-back Moth, 2 each of Rusty-dot Pearl and Silver Y, and singles of Dark Sword Grass and Gold Spot. Elsewhere, there was a noteworthy catch of 9 Orange Footman at the Grove.

For a while in the early/mid 2000s Portland was quite favoured with Many-lined records - today's specimen was our 9th out of a national total of c48 since the species fizzled out as a breeding resident of the Fens in the 19th century © Martin Cade:

The relatively poorly worked north of the island continues to throw up surprises in the moth line: in a rather round about way we received word over the weekend of a mystery larval web on blackthorn at King Barrow Quarry that on investigation today turned out, as had been suggested, to be a nest of Small Eggars; at the time of the first and hitherto only record for the island of an adult attracted to one of the Obs moth-traps last year we speculated that it'd be unlikely that Small Eggar would colonise Portland since the females would find Portland Harbour an insurmountable barrier - what do we know about anything? © Martin Cade:

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Reports of interest, Monday 4th June 2018.

Dorset Bird Club - Mon, 06/04/2018 - 22:45
Garganey - 1 Lytchett Fields RSPB.
Quail - 1+ calling Tarrant Rushton airfield.
Red-Footed Falcon - a first-summer bird went NE from Anvil Point.
Grey Plover - 1 Lytchett Fields RSPB.
Knot - 5 Lytchett Fields RSPB.
Sanderling - 11 Ferrybridge.
Puffin - 1 Dancing Ledge.
Corn Bunting - 11 Tarrant Rushton airfield.

Peregrine in Bournemouth © Clinton Whale
Grey Heron at Radipole Lake © David Wareham
House Martins at Spyway Farm © Clive Hargrave
House Martins at Spyway Farm © Clive Hargrave
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Tails and the unexpected

Peter Moores Blog - Mon, 06/04/2018 - 22:07
Swallowtail butterflies were the main target of my recent Bank Holiday weekend in the fens and I was not to be disappointed, seeing them shortly after my arrival at one of the most well-known and accessible sites for this species, Strumpshaw Fen near Norwich. I arrived mid-afternoon to find unexpected traffic chaos caused by a fair at the nearby Steam Museum, swelling the ranks of the Swallowtail admirers who head there at this time of year. The famous 'Doctor's garden', whose planted beds are a favourite haunt of the butterfly, was out of bounds but, having seen them on the somewhat gaudy flowers there some years ago, I was in any case hoping to see them in a more natural setting.
Swallowtail, Strumpshaw FenA wider angle showing more of the nectar sourceA portrait crop which I quite likeAfter a short wait near the garden, a Swallowtail arrived, turned its nose up at more exotic plants, floated over the mown lawn and headed for an unkempt patch full of Red Campion. I enjoyed extended views as it sought nectar from almost every flower, some of which were close to the path. Due to the long grass it was difficult to get a clear photograph but with patience, and high ISO ratings in the gathering gloom of late afternoon, I was able to take a few opportunities to capture the butterfly in this habitat.
Swallowtail, Hickling BroadNectaring on Yellow Flag Iris, abundant around the BroadA different individual, judging by the nick in the right forewingI returned early the following morning to look for butterflies and dragonflies but, having found both in short supply, on the advice of a local butterfly enthusiast I headed a little further east to Hickling Broad, which had the added advantage of avoiding more steam fair related chaos arising from the ongoing festivities at Strumpshaw!
This pair appeared to be engaged in some form of courtship, with some elaborate parallel flying manoeuvresSwallowtail must be one of the few butterflies large enough to photograph in flight distantly over a reedbed!A close-up of the exquisite hindwing pattern and tailsThis turned out to be good advice, as good numbers of Swallowtail were visiting a recently cut patch of reedbed in which Yellow Flag Iris were flourishing. Getting a clear photograph through vegetation was, again, difficult, but there was an uncluttered view of several flowers from a conveniently placed bench, so I made myself comfortable and waited. Eventually Swallowtails obliged by nectaring at the nearest flowers and then it was just a question of hoping that my chosen camera settings could capture the action of these restless, hyper-active insects.
The long tongue can be seen here searching for nectarThe mating pair - note the tails of the lower individual poking through the closed wings of the one aboveNot something you see every day: Swallowtail threesome!Sitting in the same spot for so long enabled me to become intimately familiar with the surrounding habitat, and eventually I noticed a pair of Swallowtail apparently mating low down in the reedbed. They were repeatedly bothered by a third individual, which seemed determined to get in on the action! The pair stayed bonded for at least half-an-hour before the indiscreet third party finally seemed to have ruined the moment for them, and they went their separate ways. Hopefully not before the seeds of the next generation were sown!
Hickling and Strumpshaw were also excellent for dragonflies - this a male Broad-bodied Chaser at Strumpshaw......a female Black-tailed Skimmer at Hickling......a Hairy Dragonfly at Strumpshaw......and, best of all, a Norfolk Hawker at HicklingMy view of this green-eyed monster was very restricted but made for a nice soft focus edge to this image 
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4 Apr 18 - Atlantic Odyssey - Day Seven: South Georgia - Drygalski Fjord

Birding in Poole Harbour and Beyond - Mon, 06/04/2018 - 18:00
The plan for the final morning at South Georgia was to do a zodiac cruise at Cooper Island, off the South East of South Georgia, followed by a cruise in the nearby Drygalski Fjord in the afternoon.
South GeorgiaCooper Island & Drygalski Fjord: Drygalski Fjord is a seven mile long fjord to the South West of Cooper Island
Iceberg: This reasonable sized iceberg was seen as we were sailing towards Drygalski Fjord However, as we were getting up it was clear that the wind had increased significantly overnight & there was too high a swell to safely consider a zodiac ride. The ship staff & Expedition staff quickly came up with a Plan B to cruise into Drygalski Fjord & to see if the wind & sea had calmed down for the afternoon. The fjord is wide enough to allow the Plancius to safely cruise all the way to the glacier at the far end. The fjord was still windy, but we could still look from the deck, albeit it was fairly cold.
Drygalski Fjord: When the water looks this blue, it's an indication it is really cold
Drygalski Fjord: The fjord was charted by the Second German 1911-12 Antarctic Expedition & was named after Professor Erich von Drygalski who lead the First German 1091-03 Antarctic Expedition. It is believed it might have been where Anthony de la Roche (an English merchant) may have spent two weeks in 1675, when he discovered South Georgia after being blown off course whilst travelling to South America from Europe. Captain James Cook made the first landing on South Georgia in 1775Drygalski Fjord: Looking back on where we had just passed
Drygalski Fjord: There were several small glaciers high up on the steep walls of the fjord
Drygalski Fjord: The fjord ended in this impressive glacier
Drygalski Fjord: Getting closer to the glacier
Gentoo Penguins: making use of this convenient small ice flowI was surprised to hear a shout of Weddell Seal as we were approaching the far end of the fjord, but that was more down to my lack of knowledge that there is a small population in South Georgia. Looking into their status, the South Georgia population are unusually for Weddell Seals as they breed on land, rather than on the ice. Perhaps the presence of the large glacier at the end of this long fjord helps to keep the water colder than around other parts of South Georgia.
Weddell Seal: The main breeding area is Antarctica & the South Sandwich Islands with a small population in South GeorgiaWeddell Seal: these aren't the best of photos, but it only really showed its head & didn't come close to the Plancius. It was the only one we saw on the trip. The small snout & head help to identify Weddell Seals from other Seals, but it also helps having Expedition staff on board who see them regularly in Antarctica. Seem to remember it was Hans from the Expedition staff who first picked this upThere was a reasonable selection of other Birds, as well as, Antarctic Fur Seals in the fjord. However, it was the scenery that really stole the show.
Cape Petrel: There was a large raft of several hundred Cape Petrels towards the far end of the fjord
Fairy Prion
Fairy Prion
Wilson's Storm-petrel: I saw around a hundred individuals in the fjord South Georgia Pintail: A pair flew around the fjord at one point
Snowy Sheathbill: This curious Snowy Sheathbill appeared over the Plancius for a couple of minutes to check us out Antarctic Fur Seal: There were a number of Antarctic Fur Seals feeding in the water just in front of the glacier at the far end of the fjord We saw the first Chinstrap Penguins as we were leaving Drygalski Fjord, as well as, some Gentoo Penguins & Macaroni Penguins.
Gentoo Penguin: Great to see some more Gentoo PenguinsChinstrap Penguin: Chinstrap Penguins occur throughout the Subantarctic Islands around the South PoleChinstrap Penguin: My second Penguin Tick of the Odyssey
Categories: Blogs, Timeline, Twitter

Grey Pine Carpet

Nature of Dorset Reference Database - Mon, 06/04/2018 - 15:47

Associated with pine plantation and can be quite common in that environment

 

Photograph by: Mark Holloway The records for this species have been organised into reports, charts, maps and photos. Click a pic below to see the detail: Sites List Distribution Map Distribution Map Some Charts Some Photographs Original Tweets Relatives Guidance Notes
Categories: Timeline, Twitter

Peach Blossom Moth

Nature of Dorset Reference Database - Mon, 06/04/2018 - 15:41

 

Associated with bramble and so widespread and quite common

 

Photograph by: Paul Harris The records for this species have been organised into reports, charts, maps and photos. Click a pic below to see the detail: Sites List Distribution Map Distribution Map Some Charts Some Photographs Original Tweets Relatives Guidance Notes
Categories: Timeline, Twitter

Small Yellow Wave

Nature of Dorset Reference Database - Mon, 06/04/2018 - 15:36

Widespread and common in areas where there are alder trees

 

Photograph by: Dorset Wildlife Trust The records for this species have been organised into reports, charts, maps and photos. Click a pic below to see the detail: Sites List Distribution Map Distribution Map Some Charts Some Photographs Original Tweets Relatives Guidance Notes
Categories: Timeline, Twitter

Dotted Clay Moth

Nature of Dorset Reference Database - Mon, 06/04/2018 - 15:30

 

A locally common species especially near heathland

 

Photograph by: Mark Andrews The records for this species have been organised into reports, charts, maps and photos. Click a pic below to see the detail: Sites List Distribution Map Distribution Map Some Charts Some Photographs Original Tweets Relatives Guidance Notes
Categories: Timeline, Twitter

Four-dotted Footman

Nature of Dorset Reference Database - Mon, 06/04/2018 - 15:26

A coastal and woodland species with numbers often boosted by immigration

 

Photograph by: Mike Hetherington The records for this species have been organised into reports, charts, maps and photos. Click a pic below to see the detail: Sites List Distribution Map Distribution Map Some Charts Some Photographs Original Tweets Relatives Guidance Notes
Categories: Timeline, Twitter

Scorched Carpet Moth

Nature of Dorset Reference Database - Mon, 06/04/2018 - 15:20

 

A woodland and scrub species that is easily disturbed and flushed by nearby activity

 

Photograph by: John Gifford The records for this species have been organised into reports, charts, maps and photos. Click a pic below to see the detail: Sites List Distribution Map Distribution Map Some Charts Some Photographs Original Tweets Relatives Guidance Notes
Categories: Timeline, Twitter

Light Arches Moth

Nature of Dorset Reference Database - Mon, 06/04/2018 - 15:15

A widespread and common species of dry, grassy areas

 

Photograph by: Mark Andrews The records for this species have been organised into reports, charts, maps and photos. Click a pic below to see the detail: Sites List Distribution Map Distribution Map Some Charts Some Photographs Original Tweets Relatives Guidance Notes
Categories: Timeline, Twitter

Sandy Carpet Moth

Nature of Dorset Reference Database - Mon, 06/04/2018 - 15:10

 

Found along hedgerows and roadsides where red campion grows

 

Photograph by: John Gifford The records for this species have been organised into reports, charts, maps and photos. Click a pic below to see the detail: Sites List Distribution Map Distribution Map Some Charts Some Photographs Original Tweets Relatives Guidance Notes
Categories: Timeline, Twitter

Double Lobed Moth

Nature of Dorset Reference Database - Mon, 06/04/2018 - 15:06

Widespread but not common favouring damp, grassy habitats

 

Photograph by: Mike Hetherington The records for this species have been organised into reports, charts, maps and photos. Click a pic below to see the detail: Sites List Distribution Map Distribution Map Some Charts Some Photographs Original Tweets Relatives Guidance Notes
Categories: Timeline, Twitter

4 Jun 18

Martin Adlam - Mon, 06/04/2018 - 14:27
Wakeham

The moth trap went out last night and this morning there were 69 moths of 30 species. As per normal its going to take me awhile to ID them all, but below are images of all the species recorded with a few ID'd to the best of my ability.

A few new ones for Portland (if I have ID them correctly) are Spilosoma lubricipeda (White Ermine), Platyptilia gonodactyla (Triangle Plume), Korscheltellus lupulina (Common Swift) and Pasiphila rectangulata (Green Pug).

Also 6 Ichneumon wasp sp., 1 Click Beetle and a 22 Spot Ladybird (Psyllobora vigintiduopunctata)


Totals in brackets.
A. Spilosoma lubricipeda, White Ermine (3)
B. Platyptilia gonodactyla, Triangle Plume (1)
C. Korscheltellus lupulina, Common Swift (1)
D. moth sp. (1)
E. moth sp. (2)
F. moth sp. (1)
G. moth sp. (note killed by spider in the moth trap). (1)
H. moth sp. (1)
I. Horisme vitalbata, Small Waved Umber (2)
J. Colostygia pectinataria, Green Carpet (1)
K. Dysstroma truncata, Common Marbled Carpet (1)
L. Autographa gamma, Silver Y (3)
M. Myelois circumvoluta, Thistle Ermine (2)
N. Eupithecia subfuscata, Grey Pug (6)
O. Pasiphila rectangulata, Green Pug (1)
P. pug sp. (1)
Q. Possibly the same as above. (1)
R. moth sp. (1)
S. moth sp. (1)
T. moth sp (1)
U. moth sp. (1)
V. moth sp. (8)
W. Possibly same species as above (1)X. Moth sp. (1)Y. Anania fuscalis, Cinerous Pearl - Not sure on this one (1)Z. moth sp. (1)Z1. moth sp. (8)Z2. moth sp. (1)Z3. Plutella xylostella, Diamond-backed Moth (12)Z4. moth sp. (1) 
A. Spilosoma lubricipeda, White Ermine  (3)
B. Platyptilia gonodactyla, Triangle Plume (1)
C. Korscheltellus lupulina, Common Swift (1)
D. moth sp. (1)
E. moth sp. (2)
E. As above
F. moth sp. (1)
G. moth sp. (note killed by spider in the moth trap). (1)
H. moth sp. (1)
I. Horisme vitalbata, Small Waved Umber (2)
J. Colostygia pectinataria, Green Carpet (1)
K. Dysstroma truncata, Common Marbled Carpet (1)
L. Autographa gamma, Silver Y (3)
M. Myelois circumvoluta, Thistle Ermine (2)
N. Eupithecia subfuscata, Grey Pug (6)
O. Pasiphila rectangulata, Green Pug (1)
P. pug sp. (1)
Q. Possibly the same as above. pug sp. (1)
R. moth sp. (1)
S. moth sp. (1)
T. moth sp (1)
U. moth sp. (1)
V. moth sp. (8)
W. Possibly same species as above (1)
X. Moth sp. (1)
Y. Anania fuscalis, Cinerous Pearl - Not 100% sure though. (1)
As above Anania fuscalis, Cinerous Pearl
Z. moth sp. (1)
Z1. moth sp. (8)
Z2. moth sp. (1)
As above
Z3. Plutella xylostella, Diamond-backed Moth (12)
Z4. moth sp. (1)
As above
Ichneumon wasp sp.
22 Spot Ladybird, Psyllobora vigintiduopunctata
Click Beetle.
Categories: Blogs, Timeline, Twitter

3rd June

Portland Bird Observatory - Mon, 06/04/2018 - 09:39
The loss of the Rosy Starlings that couldn't be found today ended a nice little run of oddities, with only a fly-by Hooded Crow at Blacknor providing minor compensatory interest. In very sunny and warm conditions new commoner migrants were at a premium: 3 Chiffchaffs, a Wheatear and a Lesser Whitethroat were additions to a lingering Black Redstart at the Bill and 21 Sanderling were at Ferrybridge. Sea reports included 47 Common Scoter and a Black-throated Diver through off the Bill.

We secured a nice proof of breeding during the evening when a cursory scan of Portland Harbour revealed a family of Shelducks slowing making their way from the breakwaters (where they probably breed every year although proof is usually lacking) towards Small Mouth - we thought they'd eventually make it under the bridge and into the Fleet but at the last moment they were spooked by a paddle-boarder and were still milling around in the harbour when we had to leave. Rather gormlessly we'd forgotten to put a 'proper' camera in the car so had to resort to phonescoping to record the event - our ineptitude at this technique is plain to see © Martin Cade:


The return of clear skies and sunshine looks to have been the cue for the Rosy Starlings to move on which is a shame since photo opportunities during the latter part of their stay were hindered by fog when it/they were often looking really bedraggled © Nick Hopper:
Categories: Timeline, Twitter

The nature of Dorset in tweets, charts, photos and maps ... 03-06-18

Nature of Dorset Records Timeline - Mon, 06/04/2018 - 07:59
Click/tap the logo to proceed to the page.

The nature of Dorset yesterday in tweets, charts, photographs and maps along with other sources of news of nature conservation and general wildlife interest:

  • Yesterday.s recorded sightings of mammals, birds, insects, plants and more
  • The current recording "hot-list" - the best recorded 30 species in the last 30 days
  • A map of sites where yesterdays records came from - what was seen near you?
  • Yesterday's records in graphical form to show the highlights
  • The pick of the photographs that came with the tweets
  • Interesting news items, notices of events and links to blogs
  • Links to the Nature of Dorset Daily newspaper and to various other blogs from Dorset conservation organisations

Everything you wanted to know and more ... and it's free of charge and free of adverts!

 

Published Date: Monday, 25 December, 2017 - 09:30 newsdesk logo.jpg
Categories: Timeline, Twitter

Reports of interest, Sunday 3rd June 2018.

Dorset Bird Club - Sun, 06/03/2018 - 23:47
Quail - 1+ calling Tarrant Rushton airfield.
Spoonbill - 1 Christchurch Harbour.
Hooded Crow - 1 Blacknor (Portland).
Black Redstart - 1 Portland Bill.

Late news:  There were two Rose-Coloured Starling on Portland yesterday (rather than the single bird originally noted).
Categories: Timeline, Twitter

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