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Sightings - Friday 6th July 2018

Dorset Bird Club - Fri, 07/06/2018 - 23:46
Whooper Swan - 1 still Abbotsbury Swannery
Manx Shearwater - 21 past Abbotsbury Beach
Osprey - 1 Arne RSPB a.m, 1 briefly Wareham Forest.
Little Ringed Plover - 1 juv. Stanpit Marsh
Whimbrel - 2 Stanpit Marsh
Green Sandpiper - 1 Abbotsbury Swannery
Greenshank - 2 Middlebere
Little Gull - 1 Portland Bill
Hobby - 1 Abbotsbury Swannery
Yellow Wagtail - 1 Abbotsbury Swannery
Also a mixed flock of 200+ hirundine head towards West Bexington past Abbotsbury Beach.
Kestrel - 1 of 5 Hengistbury Head © Clinton Whale
House Martin - Southbourne © Clinton Whale
House Martin - Southbourne © Clinton Whale
Categories: Timeline, Twitter

6th July

Portland Bird Observatory - Fri, 07/06/2018 - 22:31
The heat returned with a vengeance today and seemed to have restricted fieldwork to the two ends of the day. The best of the numbers at the Bill were offshore, with 47 Common Scoter, 24 Manx Shearwaters, 21 Mediterranean Gulls, 6 Sandwich Terns and singles of Yellow-legged Gull, Little Gull, Black-headed Gull and Common Gull through or lingering. Another pulse of overhead passage included 31 Swifts, 7 Sand Martins and singles of Greenshank and Redshank over the Bill.

A surge in Diamond-back Moth numbers saw 247 trapped overnight at the Obs - the year's highest total to date. More on the moths to follow tomorrow.
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6 Jul 18

Martin Adlam - Fri, 07/06/2018 - 16:40
Bottom Combe

A lovely day again and I thought I'd have another look for the elusive Large Tortoiseshell. And it appears I was third time lucky with four sightings of it this afternoon. It did prefer the Blackberry flowers, but it was so flighty that I was unable to photograph it. Location was Here

Other butterflies present were: Small Skipper, Large Skipper, Large White, Speckled Wood, Ringlet, Meadow Brown, Gatekeeper, Marbled White, Red Admiral, Peacock and Small Blue.

Also noted were dozens of Six-spot Burnet moths and 2 Silver Y's, plus the usual Swollen-thighed Beetles, Common Red Soldier Beetles and Red-tailed Cuckoo-bees.

Here are few images from this afternoon.

Lots of Gatekeepers about.
Another one.
And another.
Plus one more.
Not a Gatekeeper but a Meadow Brown. Lots of these still on the wing.
Ringlet
Large Skipper
Common Red Soldier Beetles
Of Interest

A bit of nostalgia with a video showing the last train to Portland in the 60's.

The Last Train to Portland courtesy of "The Portland Rocks CIC
Categories: Blogs, Timeline, Twitter

The nature of Dorset in tweets, charts, photos and maps ... 05-07-18

Nature of Dorset Records Timeline - Fri, 07/06/2018 - 07:40
Click/tap the logo to proceed to the page.

The nature of Dorset yesterday in tweets, charts, photographs and maps along with other sources of news of nature conservation and general wildlife interest:

  • Yesterday.s recorded sightings of mammals, birds, insects, plants and more
  • The current recording "hot-list" - the best recorded 30 species in the last 30 days
  • A map of sites where yesterdays records came from - what was seen near you?
  • Yesterday's records in graphical form to show the highlights
  • The pick of the photographs that came with the tweets
  • Interesting news items, notices of events and links to blogs
  • Links to the Nature of Dorset Daily newspaper and to various other blogs from Dorset conservation organisations

Everything you wanted to know and more ... and it's free of charge and free of adverts!

 

Published Date: Monday, 25 December, 2017 - 09:30 newsdesk logo.jpg
Categories: Timeline, Twitter

5th July

Portland Bird Observatory - Thu, 07/05/2018 - 22:28
Although fog clung on at the Bill until well into the afternoon, for the most part today saw the return of fine and increasingly warm conditions. Three Black-tailed Godwits passing through at the Bill, at least 2 Yellow-legged Gulls lingering offshore there and an increase to 6 Redshanks at Ferrybridge provided the best of today's birding, with 25 Manx Shearwaters and at least 4 Mediterranean Gulls off the Bill and 26 Mediterranean Gulls and 20 Dunlin at Ferrybridge the best of the rest.

Moth numbers tailed off noticeably in the overnight fog but some of the commoner immigrants were relatively well represented, with 72 Silver Y, 34 Diamond-back Moth, 4 Dark Sword Grass, a Hummingbird Hawkmoth and a Four-spotted Footman at the Obs and 62 Silver Y in one trap at the Grove.
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Sightings - Thursday 5th July 2018

Dorset Bird Club - Thu, 07/05/2018 - 21:35
Very few reports today.

Cuckoo - 1 adult Middlebere, 1 juvenile Hartland Moor.
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14 Apr 18 - Atlantic Odyssey - Day Sixteen: At Sea From Tristan Da Cunha To St Helena

Birding in Poole Harbour and Beyond - Thu, 07/05/2018 - 17:14
Today was the first of four full days at sea between Tristan da Cunha & St Helena. It was an ominous start to the day looking at the weather. Fortunately, the weather picked up during the day.
Early morning view from the PlanciusWe were now at the start of the warmer tropical waters. At dawn, the sea temperature was 22 degrees which compared with 20 degrees at Tristan da Cunha, 16 degrees at Gough Island, 12 degrees for the two days before Gough Island and a mere 3 degrees around South Georgia & for the first two days after leaving South Georgia. The warmer waters & being back in deep ocean meant we were destined to see low numbers of Seabirds during the day. My personal counts were a single Yellow-nosed Albatross, 2 Sooty Albatrosses, 8+ Great-winged Petrels, 15+ Soft-plumaged Petrels, 15+ Spectacled Petrels & a lone Storm-petrel sp. It was the last day I was to see most of these species with only a couple of Great-winged Petrels & Spectacled Petrels lasting for a final day.
Soft-plumaged Petrel: The last day I was to see any of these great Pterodromas Spectacled Petrel: I only saw two more on the following dayAs well as the last of the cold Southern ocean Seabirds, we saw the first Cory's Shearwater cross the bows in the late afternoon. It was the only one we saw until we left St Helena & started heading for Ascension Island, so was well away from the main Cory's Shearwater waters.
Cory's Sheawater: The extend of black in the wing tip makes this a Cory's Shearwater. There is a lot less white in the outer primaries of Scopoli's Shearwaters. I will come back to the separation of these two subspecies later in one of the future Odyssey PostsAlthough we didn't see any Cetaceans during the day, we did manage to see a Blue Shark, as well as, another Shark sp.
Blue Shark: It was probably only 20 metres off the side of the Plancius
Blue Shark: I saw a few Sharks during the trip, but few could be identified. Generally, all I saw was a dorsal or tail fin breaking the surface & on several occasions these were also at some distance in front of the Plancius & they had disappeared underwater before we got closer. However, we did manage to identify some of the Sharks seen & I'll come back to them in a later Post
Categories: Blogs, Timeline, Twitter

5 Jul 18

Martin Adlam - Thu, 07/05/2018 - 10:28
Wakeham

When Dawn and I moved to Wakeham last year, there were a pair of Herring Gulls nesting on a neighbours rooftop, one of which was ringed as Blue and Orange 771. Turns out BO (as she was nicknamed) was a regularly visitor to kitchens in the neighbourhood.

Having sent away for details on BO771 I received information from Paul Stewart (The Severn Estuary Gull Group) and it turned out that she probably hatched in 2004 and subsequently ringed in 2006.

Last year she had 2 chicks, which sadly died, however this year she hatched just one egg and junior has just left the nest and is exercising his wings on the neighbours conservatory roof.

Unfortunately next year will be difficult to be certain that BO has remained faithful to her nest site, as a few weeks ago her leg ring snapped off. What is extraordinary though is that the ring wasn't found in the neighbourhood, but in a road over a mile a way at The Grove, by the lady whose house BO frequents to eat her cats breakfast in Wakeham. Now that is a incredible coincidence.

BO's left leg has a slight wound to it, but is healing well. Next year of course it would be nigh impossible to recognise her.

 More on BO Here.

Here are few images of BO's offspring and of BO from last year:

2017
Now this is BO last year, waiting for the neighbours cat to finish its breakfast.
This was 2017 and BO with her chicks.
Unfortunately both the chicks perished, but BO had a successful year this year.
2018
Meet the parents, BO and her partner.
And here is Junior.
Very alert.
And having a good stretch to exercise those wings.
BO Junior.
Categories: Blogs, Timeline, Twitter

The nature of Dorset in tweets, charts, photos and maps ... 04-07-18

Nature of Dorset Records Timeline - Thu, 07/05/2018 - 08:15
Click/tap the logo to proceed to the page.

The nature of Dorset yesterday in tweets, charts, photographs and maps along with other sources of news of nature conservation and general wildlife interest:

  • Yesterday.s recorded sightings of mammals, birds, insects, plants and more
  • The current recording "hot-list" - the best recorded 30 species in the last 30 days
  • A map of sites where yesterdays records came from - what was seen near you?
  • Yesterday's records in graphical form to show the highlights
  • The pick of the photographs that came with the tweets
  • Interesting news items, notices of events and links to blogs
  • Links to the Nature of Dorset Daily newspaper and to various other blogs from Dorset conservation organisations

Everything you wanted to know and more ... and it's free of charge and free of adverts!

 

Published Date: Monday, 25 December, 2017 - 09:30 newsdesk logo.jpg
Categories: Timeline, Twitter

4th July

Portland Bird Observatory - Thu, 07/05/2018 - 00:19
An unexpectedly profound change in the weather saw first a band of steady rain arrive in off the Channel before fog developed and, at least in some spots, lingered for the rest of the day. New arrivals included the first 4 juvenile Yellow-legged Gulls of the summer at Ferrybridge, where 2 Little Ringed Plovers, a Redshank and a Common Gull also dropped in; a Curlew was the only worthwhile newcomer at the Bill, whilst seawatching there came up with 30 Manx Shearwaters, 7 Mediterranean Gulls and a Black-headed Gull.

We're sure that the majority of blog viewers wouldn't thank us if we bored them witless with a summer of endless rather tiresome images of baby seagulls growing up so it's good to get Yellow-legged Gull - a very young/fresh juvenile in this case - done and dusted straight away © Joe Stockwell...


...and while we're at it we can kill two birds with one stone by getting juvenile Mediterranean Gull done at the same time - there was a fly-by at the Bill a couple of days ago but today was the first day with settled birds at Ferrybridge © Joe Stockwell:

This Common Gull was a rather rarer mid-summer visitor to Ferrybridge © Martin Cade:

The season's first juvenile Redshank, also at Ferrybridge © Debby Saunders:

And the latest two of what's been a nice recent flurry of Little Ringed Plovers at Ferrybridge © Martin Cade:

Today's rain and then fog were a welcome relief from the scorching heat of the last few weeks; by the evening the top of the island and Chiswell were treated to a nice sunset whilst Lyme Bay, Weymouth and the mainland were all hidden beneath an enveloping blanket of fog ©  Martin Cade: 

And a bit more catching up: the emergence of Lunar Hornet Clearwings at the Obs was nearly a fortnight later than last year, with the first spotted on Sunday (1st); we must have jammed into this female within minutes of her emerging since she had three males buzzing frantically around her - just as soon as one coupled the other two completely vanished © Martin Cade:

There's been a lot of interest from folk wanting to come and twitch them but they're proving to be just as tricky to get to grips with as they were last year - despite plenty of looking, this one that we fluked into settled on a mist-net this morning has been the only other one that we've seen so far © Martin Cade:

It seems as though Portland was a bit too far west to have scored with any of the rarer immigrant moths that have been reported in recent days - this Splendid Brocade on Monday (2nd) was about as good as it got for us © Martin Cade:

Categories: Timeline, Twitter

Sightings - Wednesday 4th July 2018

Dorset Bird Club - Wed, 07/04/2018 - 22:09
Spoonbill - 2 Lytchett Bay
Little Ringed Plover - 2 Ferrybridge a.m.
Common Sandpiper - 1 Stanpit Marsh
Green Sandpiper - 1 Lytchet Fields RSPB
Wood Sandpiper - 1 Abbotsbury Swannery

Linnet - Stanpit Marsh © Clinton Whale

Juvenile Robin - Stanpit Marsh © Clinton Whale
Categories: Timeline, Twitter

4 Jul 18

Martin Adlam - Wed, 07/04/2018 - 20:46
Mermaid Track, Rufus Castle, St Andrews Church and Pennsylvania Castle Wood

After weeks of drought and hot sunny days, the heavens finally opened last night and early this morning. The rest of the day felt considerably cooler and very welcome, especially as the cloud cover didn't budge apart from the occasional break when the sun tried to come out but disappeared as the cloud rolled in off the sea.

Apart from the lack of any "blue" butterflies, it was very much the same with dozens of Marbled Whites and Ringlets on the wing. There appears to be fewer Meadow Browns about, however what was noticeable were several Gatekeepers flitting about in the brambles.
It's quite noticeable how butterflies appear at different times throughout Spring and Summer. In fact today I saw quite a few Red Admirals, especially on the Buddleia, which seem to have burst into flower over night.
No Small Tortoiseshells about, but I did get one Peacock. Also seen were 2 Large Whites and a Small White.
On my walk I came across at least 4 Silver Y moths, 2 Mother Shipton's, 3 Six-spot Burnet Moths and one moth to ID. I also came across a caterpillar suspended by a thread, not sure if its moth caterpillar or that of a sawfly.
As always many bees about, especially Red-tailed Cuckoo-bees (Bombus rupestris). They are very numerous on Portland. Also about good numbers of Common Carder Bee (Bombus pascuorum) and Small Garden Bumblebee (Bombus hortorum).
A Common Wasp (Vespula vulgaris) was seen in the grounds of St Andrew's Church and in Penn's wood I came across the smallest ichneumon wasp I have ever seen. If indeed it was one. At least I managed a couple of photos of it!!
The cooler weather saw an increase in hoverflies especially Marmalade hoverflies (Episyrphus balteatus). Also recorded were Long Hoverfly (Sphaerophoria scripta), Chequered hoverfly (Melanostoma scalare) and a new species for me a Helophilus trivittatus

The first time in ages I came across 2 Bloody-nosed Beetles (Timarcha tenebricosa), unfortunately only one live one.

Other bugs and things recorded were Common Red Soldier Beetles (Rhagonycha fulva), Dark Bush-cricket (Pholidoptera griseoaptera), Common Field Grasshopper (Chorthippus brunneus), Common Green Grasshopper (Omocestus viridulus), Harlequin ladybird (Harmonia axyridis), Common Green Shieldbug 3rd instar nymph (Palomena prasina), what I think is one of the Tenebrionidae - Darkling beetles (Lagria hirta) and one very odd beetle-looking bug I need to ID.

Here are a few images from this afternoon:

A Gatekeeper with wings closed.
Another wings open.
A Meadow Brown
Small Skipper
As above
And again
And another worn specimen this time.
A few Red Admirals out now.
Long Hoverfly (Sphaerophoria scripta)
This is the Hoverfly, Helophilus trivittatus. Told by its very lemon coloured side patches. More on this hoverfly Here.
A moth sp.
And one of those hanging caterpillars.........
.........which eventually dropped onto a leaf. Moth or Sawfly I'm not sure.
Common Green Grasshopper (Omocestus viridulus)
Harlequin Ladybird
And a sequence of photos showing the great effort this Bloody-nosed Beetle took in its efforts to get to the the top of this grass stem.
Up he goes........
.......and then decides to head back down.........
......before changing its mind........
........and decides to climb to the top.
A Common Red Soldier Beetle.
Common Green Shieldbug 3rd instar nymph (Palomena prasina)
Well I'm stumped on this one. What ever it is it moves at lightening speed.
A possible Lagria hirta. More on this beetle Here 
Well I thought this was a small fly and I mean small. But when it took off.........
.......I was surprised to see that it wasn't a fly, but probably the smallest ichneumon wasp I have ever encountered. If indeed its an ichneumon!
Categories: Blogs, Timeline, Twitter

19 Jun 18 - Deja Vu (Almost)

Birding in Poole Harbour and Beyond - Wed, 07/04/2018 - 18:00
I was sorting out some photos for another Odyssey Blog Post, when I noticed that the Elegant Tern has reappeared in the Sandwich Tern & Mediterranean Gull colony at Pagham Harbour according to the Rare Bird Alert team. Having seen the Elegant Tern there last year when it was finally pinned down to the Pagham colony I wasn't desperately keen to dash back there again, especially as it was the start of the afternoon commute period. A couple of hours later, I checked the RBA website & found that the identification had been updated a few minutes before. It was now considered to be the American Royal Tern that had been moving around between the Channel Islands & Northern France since Feb 17. It was now 18:40 & should be a two hour journey to Pagham. Grabbing the camera & optics, I headed straight out of the door, as I made a few quick calls to locals who might head off straight away for it. Fortunately, the traffic was light as there was some footie on the TV & I pulled into the car park at Church Norton just after 20:30. The car park was packed, but somebody was about to go & I managed to slot into that space. Five minutes later I arrived at the beach & spotted Edge & some of my old Southampton Birding mates. A look through one of their telescopes quickly got me onto where it was walking around in the colony. It's a bit far to the colony for decent photos, but the light was good & it was on view: so I wasn't going to complain. I grabbed a few photos over the next thirty minutes before the light started to fade. I couldn't leave as Peter Moore was still en route & I had said I would stay to ensure he could get to see it. Finally, Peter arrived & the pressure for him was off. He wasn't in when I rang him, so I couldn't have picked him up en route. But I was planning to stay over if I hadn't seen it, so sharing a lift on this occasion wouldn't have worked anyway.
Part of the Pagham Harbour Tern colony: The Royal Tern was just to the right of the bungalow with the white end
Royal Tern: Close crop of the last photoI had seen the Royal Tern in Ireland in 2016. However, this was a British & English Tick so was worth making the effort. Secondly, this individual has been identified as the American subspecies, whereas the Irish Royal Tern had been identified as the African subspecies (both identified based on DNA samples). There have been suggestions in recent years that the two subspecies could be split at some point in the future. It wouldn't make any difference to my British List, however, there is a potential Tick in those circumstances to my British & Irish List.
Royal Tern: Another harsh crop. However, I'm just grateful I was able to see it that evening as it was too far for many Birders to get there after the news brokeThe following morning the Royal Tern disappeared out to sea just after 04:35 & was never seen again. I wasn't too worried at this point as I had seen it, but I did feel sorry for those Birders who hadn't made it by dawn. Generally, I like to wait on news, but rare Terns are the exception that make me want to be there pre-dawn (if I can't see them the evening before), as they have a habit of disappearing out of Tern colonies very early.
Royal Tern: About half an hour after I arrived, the light started to goI had a pleasant day sorting more Odyssey photos, until 20:15 that evening, when I checked the RBA website & found the Royal Tern had been seen again at Lodmoor, before flying out to sea. Here we go again. I skipped the camera as the light would have been poor & again raced out of the door, whilst ringing locals. Another footie match & quiet roads & I arrived around 20:45. There was a group of about 15-20 locals on the beach scanning the bay & chatting, but it was negative news. Well it was only going to be an hour or so until it got dark, so I decided to wait it out. Around 21:30 a few people started departing, but I was going to stay to close to last light, before moving for a final check of the Lodmoor Tern islands. At 21:35, Marcus Lawson rang to say he had just found it sitting on a buoy out in Portland Harbour & visible from the Billy Winters cafe at Ferrybridge. I shouted the update to the other Birders & ran to the car. Ten minutes later, I was pulling into the Billy Winters car park & was first to Marcus's telescope which was trained on the buoy. I became the first Birder to have seen it on consecutive nights in different English counties. I think Julian Thomas was the only only person to get the double when he arrived after 22:00. Again, it disappeared first thing in the morning & only one or two people managed to see it. As I write this Post at the start of July, it hasn't been refound in the country. But there must be a reasonable chance it will pop up in another Tern colony somewhere on the South coast in the next few weeks.
Categories: Blogs, Timeline, Twitter

The nature of Dorset in tweets, charts, photos and maps ... 03-07-18

Nature of Dorset Records Timeline - Wed, 07/04/2018 - 08:24
Click/tap the logo to proceed to the page.

The nature of Dorset yesterday in tweets, charts, photographs and maps along with other sources of news of nature conservation and general wildlife interest:

  • Yesterday.s recorded sightings of mammals, birds, insects, plants and more
  • The current recording "hot-list" - the best recorded 30 species in the last 30 days
  • A map of sites where yesterdays records came from - what was seen near you?
  • Yesterday's records in graphical form to show the highlights
  • The pick of the photographs that came with the tweets
  • Interesting news items, notices of events and links to blogs
  • Links to the Nature of Dorset Daily newspaper and to various other blogs from Dorset conservation organisations

Everything you wanted to know and more ... and it's free of charge and free of adverts!

 

Published Date: Monday, 25 December, 2017 - 09:30 newsdesk logo.jpg
Categories: Timeline, Twitter

3rd July

Portland Bird Observatory - Tue, 07/03/2018 - 22:55
With a lot more cloud in the sky birding was considerably easier today but there looked to be very little about, with 60 more Swifts through over the Bill, 20 Manx Shearwaters, 19 Common Scoter, 8 Black-headed Gulls and 3 Mediterranean Gulls through or lingering off the Bill, 3 Sand Martins through over Ferrybridge and 13 Dunlin settled there.

A Purple-bordered Gold at Reap Lane - a new moth for the island - was the highlight of the night's moth-trapping; the immigrant tally at the Obs consisted of 46 Diamond-back Moth, 19 Silver Y, 2 each of Dark Sword Grass and Cream-bordered Green Pea, and singles of Bird-cherry Ermine, Cock's-head Bell, Bulrush Cosmet, Hummingbird Hawkmoth, Delicate and Green Silver-lines.

In as much as heathland insects are pretty well-represented amongst the ever-growing list of strays making it out to Portland, Purple-bordered Gold might well have made it on to a list of possible future additions even though it does appear to be only a thinly distributed inhabitant of the south-east Dorset heaths - the recent spell of hot weather and freshening northeasterly winds certainly offered up what looked to be ideal conditions for dispersal away from that area © Martin Cade:

And with rain setting in whilst we're compiling this update we've got an opportunity for a bit of catching up so it's back to Sunday 1st for some nice photographs of the Little Ringed Plover at Ferrybridge and one of the Southwell Peregrines © Pete Saunders:


Categories: Timeline, Twitter

Reports of interest, Tuesday 3rd July 2018.

Dorset Bird Club - Tue, 07/03/2018 - 21:46
Hobby - 2 Stoborough, 1 Longham Lakes.
Little Ringed Plover - 1 Longham Lakes, 12 RSPB Lytchett Fields.
Grey Plover - 1 RSPB Lytchett Fields.
Whimbrel - 1 RSPB Lytchett Fields, 2 Stanpit.
Common Sandpiper - 2 RSPB Lytchett Fields.
Green Sandpiper - 17 RSPB Lytchett Fields.
Greenshank - 2 RSPB Lytchett Fields, 2 Stanpit.
Categories: Timeline, Twitter

3 Jul 18

Martin Adlam - Tue, 07/03/2018 - 19:12
Wakeham

An afternoon spent in the back garden and the main highlight was watching dozens of small hoverflies above the Cherry tree. In amongst them a few Marmalade Hoverflies (Episyrphus balteatus).

Also seen amongst the plants were Common Field Grasshoppers (Chorthippus brunneus), a Great Green Bush Cricket (Tettigonia viridissima), 2 Silver Y moths, a Large White, a 7-spot Ladybird and a Lacewing.

Here are a few images:

A Marmalade Hoverfly............
.........and my feeble attempt of one in flight
Lots of these small hoverflies in the garden with dozens flying above the cherry tree.
A Great Green Bush Cricket
And a Lacewing.
Categories: Blogs, Timeline, Twitter

30 Jun 18 - Island Butterflies

Birding in Poole Harbour and Beyond - Tue, 07/03/2018 - 18:00
The previous Post covered the trip to the Isle of Wight for Southern Emerald Damselflies. This Post covers some of the Butterflies seen at Bouldnor Forest. With the Southern Emerald Damselflies being the main target, I only spent a few minutes photographing the Butterflies. However, it is clearly a reasonable site for Butterflies & would be clearly worth exploring if time permitted. I saw several Marbled Whites, White Admirals, Silver-washed Fritillaries & a Purple Hairstreak without making any effort to search for Butterflies.
White Admiral: There were several along the entrance trackPurple Hairstreak: It was feeding on salts in the mud. I've seen Butterflies doing this on muddy edged puddles on many occasions in the Tropics, but I've not seen them do it very often in the UK. One of the Silver-washed Fritillaries was also doing the same, but it wouldn't pose for a photograph. It was also nice to see a Purple Hairstreak on the ground rather in the treetops
Categories: Blogs, Timeline, Twitter

2nd July

Portland Bird Observatory - Tue, 07/03/2018 - 11:19
On what was apparently Portland's hottest day so far during the ongoing spell of glorious weather - probably not the best day to have chosen to be toiling over building the bulk of a permanent brick barbeque in the Obs garden! - there was a fair bit of early autumn passage afoot. Swifts were most conspicuous, with at least 90 through over the Obs, whilst sea passage off the Bill included 36 Manx Shearwaters, 11 Black-headed Gulls, 7 Mediterranean Gulls, 6 Common Scoter, 6 commic terns, 3 Whimbrel and singles of Teal, Curlew, Great Skua and Sandwich Tern. Other odds and ends of note included the first 3 Sand Martins of the season through at the Bill and 12 Dunlin, 11 Mediterranean Gulls, a Sanderling and a Curlew at Ferrybridge.

A Red-veined Darter was in the Bill Quarry during the morning.

The Large Tortoiseshell at Bottomcombe was still present for a while during the morning but couldn't be found later in the day.

The first Splendid Brocade of the year was the best of an improvement catch of immigrant moths at the Obs, where 148 Diamond-back Moth, 23 Silver Y, 12 Cock's-head Bell Zeiraphera isertana, 2 European Corn-borer, 2 Water Veneer and singles of Willow Ermine, Dark Spectacle and Marbled White-spot were also trapped.
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