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Latest News from the Nature of Dorset

This is a digest of items to the Nature of Dorset in the last 24 hours. It includes sightings lists, news and blog entries from conservation organisations where their websites provide RSS feeds and also access to some of the other information I glean from Twitter each day relative to nature in Dorset

Some of these posts may have been truncated to make the page viewable. You can see the whole of an article by clicking on its title

You can also click on the title to comment on the article if you wish.

Displaying 1 - 12 of 12
  • Birds of Poole Harbour's picture
    Author: 
    Birds of Poole Harbour

    Was it really only April 9th today? It could have been July 9th as the sun beamed down and as the light SE wind blew. It reached 20 degrees in some parts of Dorset today and long may it continue. Positivity is much need at the moment and nothing brightens a nations mood than a good sunny bank holiday?well, normally!

    This morning our current star of the show, female Osprey CJ7 made her debut (online) TV appearance when we were invited to host a video on Chris Packhams daily morning wildlife show ?The Self Isolation Bird Blub? You can watch the whole show HERE (as it?s all great), but if it?s Osprey info you?d like, you can skip to 26:30 and see our piece. Huge thanks to Meg and Chris for inviting us on, it was great to be able to give the project this boost and allow so many people to witness the magic!

    CJ7 displayed some interesting behaviour both on and off the nest today. She had actually been ?doing the rounds? early morning and had been present on a different harbour nest platform about 10 minutes before arriving on the webcam. She then spent most of the late morning bringing a few large sticks to the nest and some dry moss too, before disappearing off for a feed in the afternoon. It seems any time between 6am and midday is a good time to tune in, but her behaviour will change as the days and weeks progress, so lets see what happens. We also mentioned yesterday the presence of a SECOND Osprey that?s also in the harbour currently. We sure it?s ?Beaky? and she too has taken up semi-residence on a harbour platform and is currently looking settled. How long she?ll stay for is any ones guess but LS7 better hurry up soon!

    Other sightings from across the harbour today included a good pulse of Swallow north with many people logging them whilst out on their health walks. Another Osprey, this time a migrant was seen heading north over Upton in the early afternoon and yet more Red Kites were logged at Wareham Forest, Upton, Branksome, Ashley Cross, Parkstone, Poole Town and Canford Heath. A Cuckoo was calling in Wareham Forest, a couple of Tree Pipit were back on territory and a male Wheatear were present. At Lytchett Bay the first Reed Warbler of the spring was singing and Bearded Tit were on territory. A couple of migrating Tree Pipit were logged, one over Lytchett Matravers at night, and one arriving in over Alum Chine. Then, to top things off, what was assumed to be Tuesdays White Stork over Wareham was seen again in the Frome Valley near Holmebridge.

    Female Osprey CJ7 on other harbour platform this AM prior to arriving on the nest cam



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  • Tweet Contents: 
    Very sad - this fire destroyed 1.2 hectares of habitat for rare and threatened wildlife. We are pleading with visit? https://t.co/fs2zQHXxWG
    Tweet Author Name: 
    Dorset WildlifeTrust
    Creation Date: 
    Thursday, 9 April, 2020 - 09:31
  • Tweet Contents: 
    As an environmental charity we have to accept that the future will be challenging. But we will continue our fight f? https://t.co/CYUpPPc9u7
    Tweet Author Name: 
    Butterfly Conservation
    Creation Date: 
    Thursday, 9 April, 2020 - 09:37
  • Tweet Contents: 
    RT @ChrisGPackham: Cor ! Live Osprey (CJ7) from @HarbourBirds to play off today's show . . . what a treat ! Here's how it's done @baddiel?
    Tweet Author Name: 
    birdsofpooleharbour
    Creation Date: 
    Thursday, 9 April, 2020 - 10:58
  • Tweet Contents: 
    Looking for some fun activities to do at home over Easter? We need some Osprey Watchers to help us monitor the webc? https://t.co/U9MWYs3TYS
    Tweet Author Name: 
    Poole Harbour Ospreys
    Creation Date: 
    Thursday, 9 April, 2020 - 14:32
  • NoD Scrapbook's picture
    Author: 
    NoD Scrapbook

    Reduced mowing of road verges could see wildflowers bloom

    Oxeye daisies, harebells and other wildflowers could have their best summer for years if councils reduce roadside verge mowing, experts have said.
    The UK?s more than 310,000 miles of rural road verges have become arefuge for wildflowers squeezed out of the wider countryside, but often fall victim to frequent mowing which does not let them bloom and set seed.
    However, some councils are now reducing the mowing of roadside verges in line with advice from wildlife experts at Plantlife, providing a boost not just for wildflowers but for a wide array of insects, birds and mammals they support.

    White campion is one of the increasingly rare plants which could benefit from less mowing (Peter Fleming/PA)
    With coronavirus putting pressure on council services and causing staff shortages, non-essential activities such as spring mowing could fall by the wayside.
    The shift away from typically mowing the verges of rural roads, A-roads and motorways four times a year could also save large amounts of carbon dioxide emissions from the tractor mowers, Plantlife argues.
    Reducing mowing to the ?twice is nice? recommendations from the wildlife charity, cutting verges twice in late summer and autumn or once in autumn and once in early spring, could save 22,754 tonnes of carbon dioxide, it says.

    Early purple orchid on road verge in Conwy north Wales (Trevor Dines/Plantlife/PA)
    Plantlife acknowledges the need for mowing in areas where
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  • Title: 
    Portland Observatory's picture
    Author: 
    Portland Observatory
    After yesterdays celebration of spring today fell rather flat, however, it was a wonderfully warm and calm day that was perfect for finishing off some outside jobs. The highlight of the day was an early Garden Warbler along the West Cliffs. Away from the Bill, the centre of the island turned up a second Lesser Whitethroat, a male Redstart at Reap Lane and a flyover Little Ringed Plover past Blacknor. Hirundine passage had slowed but once again Swallows were the dominant force accompanied by low single figures of Sand Martins and House Martins. With the change in temperature, the sea was once again coated in a thick haze and limited sea-watching highlights to a single Arctic Skua, three Curlews and 121 Common Scoters.

    Having birding haunts such as Reap Lane and Suckthumb Quarry on your doorstep is a treat during such strange times Debby Saunders:



  • Dorset Bird Club's picture
    Author: 
    Dorset Bird Club
    Red Kite - another movement today with birds reported from Ballard Down, Bournemouth, Broadmayne, Corfe Mullen, Dorchester, Kinson, Moordown, Wareham, Weymouth
    Osprey - view the BoPH osprey webcam at https://www.birdsofpooleharbour.co.uk/osprey/osprey-webcams/
  • Dorset Bird Club's picture
    Author: 
    Dorset Bird Club
    Red Kite - birds over Corfe Mullen, Poole, Studland, Swanage, Weymouth
    Cuckoo - Wareham Forest
    Garden Warbler - West Cliffs
    Wheatear - bird in suburban Bournemouth 
    Lesser Whitethroat - Portland
    Redstart - Portland 
    Tree Pipit - birds over various locations
  • Title: 
    Christchurch Harbour Ornithological Group's picture
    Author: 
    Christchurch Harbour Ornithological Group



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  • Title: 
    Christchurch Harbour Ornithological Group's picture
    Author: 
    Christchurch Harbour Ornithological Group

    A gloriously warm day produced a couple of Little Ringed Plover heading over to the north, as well a two singing Reed Warbler ? the first of those for the season. Another debutante was a Cuckoo ? a male around Stanpit during the afternoon. Early in the day, two each of Yellow Wagtail and Wheatear were logged, as well as 4 Willow Warbler and in excess of 30 Mediterranean Gull. The passing of winter saw just 3 Brent Goose and 2 Wigeon on site, but quite which direction a drake Tufted Duck and a pair of Gadwall were taking was a little uncertain.

    Sightings Reporting and Government Restrictions
    ? a Message from the Trustees

    It is our intention to continue running daily updates on the website for sightings which are made within the exercise guidelines currently in place. We will, however, not publish news of any sighting that may attract a gathering; but, to hopefully raise the spirits of those who cannot get out, we will carry news of expected spring arrivals and trends of commoner species. The situation will be under constant review, however, and should things change we will react accordingly.

    Please note, all our scheduled face-to-face Meetings are now cancelled until at least the end of April. We will post further details later in the month.

    VIRTUAL MEETINGS
    With all of us now staying indoors, the CHOG Committee is reaching out to members through the power of the internet. We are arranging for the three talks listed below to be relayed to members in their own homes using a web-conferencing tool.

    Wednesday, April 15th, 7.30-8:00pm
    Poole Park Greylag Geese ? Thomas Weston

    Wednesday, May 13th, 7.30-8:00pm
    Cameron Bespolka Trust and the Dorset Bird Club Conference ? Alex Chapman

    Wednesday, June 10th, 7.30-8:00pm
    The Dorset Nightjar Project ? Samuel Levy

    To attend any of these online presentations, you will need internet access and a computer or tablet with built-in audio. There is a limit of 100 participants for each session, so if you would like to take part in any or all of these events, PLEASE REGISTER YOUR INTEREST BY SENDING AN EMAIL TO: editor@chog.org.uk. You will then receive joining instructions by reply mail. If there is a high demand, spaces will be allocated on a first-come, first-served basis.

    MEMBERSHIP SUBSCRIPTIONS
    A reminder these are now due for 2020. Please do join us and support our conservation work around Christchurch Harbour. Fees are just 7:00 for single or 10:00 for joint membership. The easiest way to join is online....



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  • Wednesday, 8 April, 2020

    Osprey CJ7 is back and started preparing a nest, all she needs now is a mate; we wait in hope

    Osprey CJ7 waiting patiently on a nest site for a male osprey to show an interest! [Photo: Birds of Poole Harbour nestcam]

    This is a list of the most interesting sightings for yesterday. To see the full list with more detail, maps and charts click on the 'visit website' link in the left panel:

    Species Scientific Name Interest Group Interest Level No of Reports
    Large Tortoiseshell Nymphalis polychloros Butterflies
    5
    1
    Great Northern Diver Gavia immer Birds
    4
    1
    Great Skua Catharacta skua Birds
    4
    1
    Humming-bird Hawk-moth Macroglossum stellatarum Moths
    4
    1
    Mediterranean Gull Larus melanocephalus Birds
    4
    1
    Osprey Pandion haliaetus Birds
    4
    1
    Puffin Fratercula arctica Birds
    4
    1
    Red Kite Milvus milvus Birds
    4
    13
    Spotted Redshank Tringa erythropus Birds
    4
    1
    Avocet Recurvirostra avosetta Birds
    3
    1
    Goodens Nomad Bee Nomada goodeniana Bees, Wasps and Ants
    3
    1
    Goosander Mergus merganser Birds
    3
    1
    Grasshopper Warbler Locustella naevia Birds
    3
    2
    Green Sandpiper Tringa ochropus Birds
    3
    1
    Greenshank Tringa nebularia Birds
    3
    1
    Least Black Arches Nola confusalis Moths
    3
    1
    Linnet Carduelis cannabina Birds
    3
    1
    Little Owl Athene noctua Birds
    3
    1
    Pintail Anas acuta Birds
    3
    1
    Redstart Phoenicurus phoenicurus Birds
    3
    1

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